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You are browsing the archive for Science and art Archives - Page 2 of 8 - The Plainspoken Scientist.

14 February 2019

Happy Science Valentine’s Day!

In which we offer you a series of valentines to scientific fields of study.

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4 February 2019

Conveying Science through Art: An Alternative Way of Communicating about Earth Observation research

In the Americas, We Use Satellites to Sow Dreams in the Soil is a three-part poem that was presented at the 2018 fall session of American Geophysical Union (AGU). The poem was an alternative – perhaps unconventional – way of presenting about three Earth Observation (EO) initiatives that I and colleagues at NASA’s SERVIR Science Coordination Office and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are involved with.

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28 January 2019

The World We’ll leave Our Grandchildren: Theatre as a means of stimulating the public discussion of climate change

When communicating with an audience it is important to have clear answers to the questions (i) Who are they?, (ii) What do I want them to do?, and (iii) How can they do it? It was with this in mind that in 2014 I embarked on a project to write and perform a play on climate change.

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21 January 2019

How to make glaciers fun to learn about

I’ve been studying terrestrial glaciers for a half dozen years now, and Spoiler Alert: they are melting! While seeing the demise of the cryosphere unfold before my eyes, I started to pursue more and more outreach opportunities to help “get the word out” to the public.

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3 January 2019

AGU18 debrief: Y’all love scicomm…and that makes us happy

Yes, I know. Fall Meeting was last month (and year), so what took us so long? Honestly…we were exhausted, but for the best reasons. Turns out that y’all love scicomm so much and helped to make AGU18 one of most successful for Sharing Science yet!

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28 December 2018

Drawn to Geoscience: Really, though…what was the OG paleo diet?

By Shane M Hanlon At our annual meeting early this month, researchers presented new findings that brings insight into the diets of Neanderthals. Here a good summary of the work via Eos. AND, we were fortunate enough to have our old friend JoAnna Wendel draw a comic describing the findings! Check it out below. Shane M Hanlon is a Program Manager in AGU’s Sharing Science Program. Follow him @ecologyofshane. JoAnna Wendel is a freelance science …

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17 December 2018

Drawn to Geoscience: Tornadoes form from…wait, the ground up?! Seriously?

At our annual meeting last week, researchers presented new findings showing that contrary to popular views, tornadoes may (might) form from the ground up versus from clouds down. Here a good summary of the work via The Washington Post. AND, we were fortunate enough to have our old friend JoAnna Wendel draw a comic describing the findings!

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3 December 2018

Tell a story, sing a song, & learn some stuff at AGU18!

AGU18 is…next week! Wow, that happened fast. We have a full slate of amazing science communication, policy, and outreach events planned for the entire week of the meeting!

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16 November 2018

Register for scicomm workshops, Open Mic Night, & more at AGU18

AGU18 is…oh wow…less than a month away! We in the Sharing Science program are busily putting the final touches on all the content, logistics, swag, and more to make this the more Sharing Science-y meeting yet!

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5 November 2018

A Sense of Place: Recruiting Interest in Science and Discovery Through Storytelling and Outreach

By Jane Wolken Some memories of a place are so vivid that they trigger the senses: the sight of a brilliant orange sunset viewed from a cool rock outcrop on the shore of a remote lake; the sound of a squirrel chirping from the top of a white spruce tree laden with cones; the unique smell of Labrador tea; the tart taste of Alaskan blueberries; and the abrupt touch of …

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