Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Science and art Archives - Page 2 of 11 - The Plainspoken Scientist.

11 June 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: The Monument

*Google search: equipment needed to create a documentary.*

This is how my journey to creating The Monument began. In reality, it began before I made that search, in the months (that turned into years) of being rendered unable to shake a passion that gripped me—a passion to highlight and document the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, a hub for biodiversity in the western U.S., and to share its magnificence with the general public.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


5 June 2020

#AGURocks: Times Zones

Music has been important to me for as long as I’ve been interested in science. I never really had any music training. In high school, I constantly blared CDs in the background while working on homework (so much 90s alternative and punk rock). Often taking breaks just to focus and listen intently to the music (and procrastinate) but I started to dream of playing music.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


3 June 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Go Forth and Science

Art is a thing I was really into when I was younger; I was totally that kid who took art classes outside of school, drew on napkins (and myself), and doodled in the margins of all my notebooks. But then I went to college, got sucked into the wonderful world of science, and let drawing fall off my list of usual activities.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


1 June 2020

Getting our message across with Water Pistols and a little bit of Poetry!!

As scientists we are all beginning to understand the importance of communicating our work to a wider audience than just our peers. Engaging the public helps us to dispel myths, create interest, educate and hopefully inspire the next generation of scientists. It’s also really good fun and adds a little variety to your work. So now I could be sitting at my desk one day and the next stood in front of large crowd brandishing water pistols and waving Lego figures at them. 

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


29 May 2020

#AGURocks: Cover of the Science Mag

Ever since Nick Shackleton first showed his clarinette skills on one of the first ICP conferences (most likely on the ICP3 in Cambridge) it has become a habit to have a Paleomusicology concert the night before the conference ends. It used to be quite classical but it has become more casual during the last years.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


28 May 2020

Meet the Ganimals

As computer scientists with a heart for education and curiosity of the social sciences, we began exploring the blurry lines of ‘discovery’ and ‘stewardship’ in the digital space of artificial intelligence.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


27 May 2020

#DrawntoGeoscience: Fruitcake at Sea

I was taking a break last winter from packing to go to sea aboard the JOIDES Resolution for Expedition 379 to Antarctica, scrolling through Twitter, when I saw the story of a fruitcake that had been left behind in 1911 by Sir Robert Falcon Scott’s Terra Nova expedition — and was deemed still edible.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


22 May 2020

#AGURocks: Physical Geography (i.e. Bohemian Rhapsody)

#AGURocks is a series of posts by musicians who create science-inspired music and explain their process and inspiration while also showcasing their pieces. Learn more about contributing. The views and lyrics expressed in this post and song do not reflect those of Sharing Science and AGU. This week, Rob Storrar. Back in March I woke up with, for no discernible reason, the opening lines to Queen’s epic Bohemian Rhapsody in my head, …

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


20 May 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Art asks questions, science seeks answers

#DrawnToGeoscience is a series of posts by artists who draw about science and explain their process and inspiration while also showcasing their pieces. Learn more about contributing. This week, Adam Swanson. This post is adapted from a post in a sister blog here.  Science and art are deeply related. Both involve looking hard at what is around us: taking time to observe and collect information to filter through brains. Art asks …

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


15 May 2020

#AGURocks: Geologise Theatre – All the world’s a stage!

I am a PhD student in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Oxford (UK) and one half of the musical science communication duo Geologise Theatre. We (Matthew Kemp, a fellow PhD student, and myself) write and perform songs and theatre pieces about the science of the Earth, from fossils to climate change! Shakespeare famously wrote “All the world’s a stage”, and we’ve taken that (perhaps too) literally…

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>