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19 October 2020

Making Science Accessible for All

How hot is Jupiter? Can you show the process of chromosome segregation? How does the brain control movement in your leg? All this science seems complicated because of the scientific jargon but there is a lot more to experiencing these basic concepts of life than just reading some heavy worded paragraphs.

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7 October 2020

Sharing Science scicomm workshops are now virtual!

By Shane M Hanlon We in Sharing Science do many different things. We’re scicomm trainers/practitioners, communicators, multimedia experts, artists, storytellers, and more. At the core of these various aspects of scicomm is the first item – training. Sharing Science was founded >5 years ago by my colleague Olivia with the goal of providing fellow scientists with the skills, tools, and resources they need to communicate science with any audience. The …

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28 September 2020

Storytelling basics: Narrative themes

All good stories follow some sort of structure and contain certain elements to make them special. That’s not entirely prescriptive but it does provide a good outline. One of the other major components of any good story, science-related or otherwise, is the adherence to a narrative theme. 

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25 September 2020

Drawn to Geoscience: Crowdsourced science at the intersection of art and science

Today, I am an interdisciplinary researcher, environmentalist, artist, and educator that employs art-based research methods in tandem with Western science methods to study environmental issues in the field. But life didn’t start out that way.

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14 September 2020

Making the switch from in-person to online scicomm storytelling shows

…for this post, I’m taking off my AGU hat (mostly) and stepping into one of my other roles as storyteller and producer. I also work for the science storytelling organization The Story Collider, where scientists and non-scientists alike tell true, personal stories, live on stage. Er…or at least they used to. 

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9 September 2020

Want to do outreach but don’t know where to start? We got you.

Science communication is a catch-all phrase that means so many things. Even when narrowing it down to scientists talking about their research to (mostly) non-scientists, there are still so many avenues and places to start.

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4 September 2020

#AGURocks: The Intersection of Music and Science

I didn’t start making and recording music until college, where I met some friends who had similar interests to me. They pushed me to write songs with them in a band, which was something I had wanted to do forever, but had lacked the courage to create and perform in live settings. As I progressed through my microbiology degrees, both as an undergraduate and graduate student, I used music as a way to vent about broader institutional issues I saw in the sciences.

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17 August 2020

International Observe the Moon Night: An Opportunity for Global Outreach

International Observe the Moon Night is an annual worldwide public engagement program that encourages observation, appreciation, and understanding of our Moon and its connection to planetary science and exploration. It is also a time to celebrate our personal and cultural connections to Earth’s nearest celestial neighbor.

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12 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Spot the Differences

During the first few weeks of lockdown, I spent my weekends coloring microbes, soil, and Sonoran Desert-themed drawings. In addition, I started following scientist who use art for #SciComm and science artists on social media. I was extremely inspired by Drs. Karen Vaughan and Yamina Pressler’s For The Love Of Soil art prints. Fortunately, I was able to attend a live session hosted by Dr. Pressler on how to create whimsical soil profiles using watercolors. There was no turning back from there.

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11 August 2020

Advocating for climate science

A growing number of scientists in the United States are politically active and engaged, especially around issues affecting science. And researchers have the right to participate in advocacy, even if they work for federal agencies or state-funded institutions. Despite this, we at the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund frequently speak with scientists deterred from advocacy after hearing of well-meaning colleagues who’ve been accused, for example, of violating anti-lobbying laws for writing an op-ed.

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