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12 September 2018

Talking health might shift attitudes on global warming

By Shane M Hanlon Global warming is a political issue. It shouldn’t be, but it is. I recently wrote a post about it that outlined political views on the subject, probably best summarized by this1: Takeaway: majority of folks think that global warming is happening but views vary widely based on political affiliation. You might ask, “Yeah, but there are a bunch of different people in political parties. What about …

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11 September 2018

Share your field pictures w/ us (on Tumblr)!

As some of you might be aware, we have a (freaking awesome) Instagram account that features many of our scientists showing us their field sites, labs, outreach activities, etc. (if you’re not aware, you should really check it out). In addition to Instagram, we like to feature scientists in the field via our Postcards from the Field campaign through our  Tumblr account. where scientists share stories and photos from their field experiences.

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10 September 2018

A Voice for All Part II: Creating Space for All Voices

In academia we are taught to think critically, seek answers through scientific inquiry, publish results in peer-reviewed journals, and present significant findings to colleagues at conferences. We are not taught to listen with compassion, lead across scales in areas of research, project management and support, and support diversity and inclusivity.

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4 September 2018

A Voice for All Part I: Cultivating Leadership, Diversity and Inclusivity in Academia

There are distinct moments in life that open our hearts and minds to listening, and motivate us to become better scientists, teachers, administrators, and advocates. In these moments we must not underestimate our individual and collective ability to make our world a better place.

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30 August 2018

Art asks questions, science seeks answers

This post is adapted from a post in a sister blog here.  By Adam Swanson Science and art are deeply related. Both involve looking hard at what is around us: taking time to observe and collect information to filter through brains. Art asks questions, science seeks answers. I have been drawing and painting since I was a child. I studied art in college and took it with me everywhere afterward. In …

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14 August 2018

“Eggos rock…Iggy Azalea rocks…IG-KNEE-US rocks?”- In Celebration of International Youth Day

This post was originally posted on our From the Prow blog here.  By Claudia Corona When you’ve been a student for longer than you’ve been able to tie your shoes, and when you’ve been uttering words that would be considered a gem on a Scrabble board for at least a quarter of your life, you gain special powers of scientific enunciation which should be used for good. Such thoughts dawned on me …

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2 August 2018

American (voter) attitudes on climate change are complex

Americans have strong feelings about climate change. In addition to political affiliation, it turns out that how old you are can influence the degree to which you accept human-influenced clinate change

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30 July 2018

The Message Behind Science

By Sriparna Saha “You are so creative.” I cease to remember the number of times this label has been attached to me. I’ve always had an innate passion towards art but when the time came to choose a profession, I chose to pursue science. Some people m ight argue that science and creativity are disparate entities, but I believe that science is rooted in creativity and runs on imagination. Creativity in science …

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25 July 2018

Black Lung Disease is Making a Come-Back

This is part of a series of posts from our own Shane Hanlon’s disease ecology class that he’s currently teaching at the University of Pittsburgh Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology. Students were asked to write popular science posts about (mostly) wildlife diseases. Check out all the posts here.  By Victoria Wright Black lung disease is making a come-back. Characterized by shortness of breath and hypoxemia, a recent NPR article explains that not only are …

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23 July 2018

The “Lazy” Southerner: Sloth or Anemia?

This is part of a series of posts from our own Shane Hanlon’s disease ecology class that he’s currently teaching at the University of Pittsburgh Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology. Students were asked to write popular science posts about (mostly) wildlife diseases. Check out all the posts here.  By Kausthubha Yaratha Since the postbellum period, Americans south of the Mason Dixon line have been widely stereotyped as lazy and unmotivated. Academics of the 20th …

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