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July 16, 2019

The thin line between Alaska and Canada

The boundary between Alaska and Canada is 1,538 miles long. The line is obvious in some places, such as the Yukon River valley, where crews have cut a straight line through forest on the 141st Meridian. The boundary is invisible in other areas, such as the summit of 18,008-foot Mt. St. Elias.

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July 10, 2019

Using sand models to explain the concept of geologic mapping

Geologic maps can be very visually engaging, but non-geologists may find it difficult to extract the information that a map is supposed to communicate…. Cross sections included with a map can help, but it can still be tough to pull it all together if you don’t look at this sort of material all the time.

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July 8, 2019

More WaterWords and videos from the Hunting Bubbles expedition

Five new posts from the Hunting Bubbles expedition.

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July 5, 2019

Weird world of northern dinosaurs coming into focus

The mini tyrannosaur, duck-billed swamp-stompers, armor-headed planteaters and other dinosaurs found in northern Alaska hint of a story that is theirs alone. That tale is separate from the one we learned as kids, told by fossils found in Montana, Alberta, Mongolia and other more-exposed and easier-to-get-to places.

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July 1, 2019

Cruise blog: Update on observing seafloor methane seeps at the edge of hydrate stability

Six new posts, including two videos, from the R/V Falkor on its cruise to seek out and study methane bubbles seeping out of the seafloor.

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June 28, 2019

Village move intensifying in summer 2019

The relocation of an Alaska village is happening fast this summer, after many years of planning and work. Observers say Newtok’s transition to Mertarvik is flying along because it has to — the Ninglick River bank is crumbling less than 10 yards from a Newtok home.

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June 25, 2019

Cruise blog: More observing seafloor methane seeps at the edge of hydrate stability

Six new blog posts from the continuing Hunting Bubbles research cruise.

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June 21, 2019

A sleepless walk under the midnight sun

On a Saturday morning near summer solstice, nine people stood on a smoothed pile of gravel at Mile 5 of the Dalton Highway. A man talking to the group, the fur of a wolverine wrapping his head, had invited us to what he called AlaskAcross 2019, a nonstop 60-mile hiking traverse in northern Alaska, from Lost Creek to Eureka.

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June 20, 2019

A sand model landslide compared to the 2018 Llusco event (with coordinates of the Llusco slide!)

If you Google the word “landslide”…the first search result you get is the Fleetwood Mac song. I suppose this says something about the place of Earth Science in the 2019 world, but whatever (more on this at the end of the post!). Clicking the “Images” tab improves things, assuming you are indeed seeking information about the geologic feature.

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June 18, 2019

Cruise blog: Observing seafloor methane seeps at the edge of hydrate stability

Four new updates from the ongoing cruise of the R/V Falkor…

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