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25 September 2020

Drawn to Geoscience: Crowdsourced science at the intersection of art and science

Today, I am an interdisciplinary researcher, environmentalist, artist, and educator that employs art-based research methods in tandem with Western science methods to study environmental issues in the field. But life didn’t start out that way.

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14 September 2020

Making the switch from in-person to online scicomm storytelling shows

…for this post, I’m taking off my AGU hat (mostly) and stepping into one of my other roles as storyteller and producer. I also work for the science storytelling organization The Story Collider, where scientists and non-scientists alike tell true, personal stories, live on stage. Er…or at least they used to. 

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9 September 2020

Want to do outreach but don’t know where to start? We got you.

Science communication is a catch-all phrase that means so many things. Even when narrowing it down to scientists talking about their research to (mostly) non-scientists, there are still so many avenues and places to start.

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4 September 2020

#AGURocks: The Intersection of Music and Science

I didn’t start making and recording music until college, where I met some friends who had similar interests to me. They pushed me to write songs with them in a band, which was something I had wanted to do forever, but had lacked the courage to create and perform in live settings. As I progressed through my microbiology degrees, both as an undergraduate and graduate student, I used music as a way to vent about broader institutional issues I saw in the sciences.

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12 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Spot the Differences

During the first few weeks of lockdown, I spent my weekends coloring microbes, soil, and Sonoran Desert-themed drawings. In addition, I started following scientist who use art for #SciComm and science artists on social media. I was extremely inspired by Drs. Karen Vaughan and Yamina Pressler’s For The Love Of Soil art prints. Fortunately, I was able to attend a live session hosted by Dr. Pressler on how to create whimsical soil profiles using watercolors. There was no turning back from there.

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10 August 2020

#AGURocks: Breathing new life (i.e. geology lyrics) into old songs

#AGURocks is a series of posts by musicians who create science-inspired music and explain their process and inspiration while also showcasing their pieces. Learn more about contributing. The views and lyrics expressed in this post and song do not reflect those of Sharing Science and AGU. This week, Ben Edwards. I started playing the acoustic guitar when I was about 10, had a few years of piano and coronet lessons, …

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5 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Imaginations to animations

As a kid, I could sit quietly for hours entertaining myself if I were handed a pen and a paper. Now as an adult, I still find myself doodling and sketching when I’m bored, or when I’m trying to explain something. Putting imaginations and thoughts into drawings is apparently a useful skill later in life, also as a scientist. Illustrating processes and how things work, even in the most basic form, is a useful science communication tool. 

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4 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Drawing a clearer picture of dinosaurs

To me, being able to visualize an organism helps me understand their nature better, and this is especially important for organisms that no longer exist in the present day. I am endlessly taking in information that helps me see the larger picture of a creature within its environment and how it interacts with and within it.

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31 July 2020

#AGURocks: Rocking natural history, ecology and evolution

Is it unusual for a Boomer full professor to pick up a ukulele and learn how to play – I can’t really answer that question but I can tell you it’s been a fun ride…

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19 June 2020

#AGURocks: Bromide Hill

The song “Bromide Hill” was inspired by the strange and tragic history of Oklahoma, which is also inextricably tied with the energy industry. I found Oklahoma amazingly beautiful as well, with very interesting geology as well as ecology. I wanted to write something personal, but also rooted in the history of this place (beyond just human history).

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