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You are browsing the archive for December 2017 - Mountain Beltway.

31 December 2017

To the Bright Edge of the World, by Eowyn Ivey

My friend Betsy recommended I read this novel, and I’m glad she did. It’s of an unusual structure: a series of documents, arranged in more or less chronological order (with some variation for plot structure), written by 5 principal characters, two in particular. The two are a U.S. Army captain sent on an expedition to explore the Wolverine River Valley of Alaska, and his wife, who remains behind in Vancouver, …

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30 December 2017

Normal faulting in the San Felipe Volcanic Field, New Mexico

A glance out the airplane window over New Mexico triggers a bit of web research and a new view of tectonic extension via Google Earth and geologic maps.

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28 December 2017

I Contain Multitudes, by Ed Yong

Ed Yong’s “Not Exactly Rocket Science” was one of the first science blogs that came onto my radar ten years ago when I was wading into geology blogging for the first time. He has an impressive record of excellent science journalism and really evocative writing. I was delighted to bump into him and introduce myself at the March for Science last winter. I hadn’t realized that he lived in DC …

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27 December 2017

Ten years of Mountain Beltway

Callan has been blogging about geology for a decade. Here are a few reflections on those ten years behind the wheel of “Mountain Beltway.”

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22 December 2017

The #FaultCup semifinals

Over the past few weeks, there’s been a fun game playing out on Twitter, hosted by Jorge (@lithospheric), called The Fault Cup, or #FaultCup in Twitterspeak. There’s a bracket showing one-on-one match ups between different faults, and then a 24 hour Twitter poll is posted, where the audience can vote for which one they want to advance to the next round.  Click through to embiggen. If you’ve missed the fast …

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15 December 2017

Aerial Geology, by Mary Caperton Morton

There’s a lovely new coffee table book out, just in time for holiday shopping. My fellow EARTH magazine contributor Mary Capterton Morton is the author of Aerial Geology, a beautiful massive tome that profiles a hundred geologically interesting locations across the North American continent. Mary was kind enough to forward me a copy for review, and I was delighted to flip through its gorgeous pages. It’s a visual feast, with …

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8 December 2017

Friday fold: Alpine cross sections by Albert Heim

The Friday fold is a figure from a 1922 book about the geology of the Alps by Swiss structural geology genius and artistic master Albert Heim. Marvel at his gorgeous depiction of the internal and long-since-eroded structure of these mighty mountains.

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6 December 2017

My GSW Presidential address

I can hardly believe it but tonight I wrap up my tenure as the 2017 President of the Geological Society of Washington. In our Society, it’s a tradition for the President to give the final talk of the year, a Presidential Address that takes up the entirety of the final regular meeting. I’ll be talking tonight about the art of geology. Specifically, my title is “Visualization in geology: A brief …

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5 December 2017

The quarry in Contessa Gorge

Central Apennine stratigraphy and structure is on display in the wall of a quarry in Contessa Gorge, Italy. Have a look a nice normal fault and a submarine mass transport deposit.

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4 December 2017

Book reviews: Recent fiction reads

How about I take this opportunity to catch on Reporting My Books? These are some not-necessarily geology-relevant, but also maybe pretty interesting books that I’ve read lately. All are fiction. 11/22/63, by Stephen King I started reading this time-travel novel by Stephen King last month when a significant trove (though not everything) of files from the government’s accounting of the Kennedy Assassination was declassified and released to the public. King’s …

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