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11 January 2019

Friday fold: more from Utah

For the final Friday fold of 2018, we return to Utah’s Slate Canyon, where “Mountain Beltway” reader Octavia Sawyer shares an anticline with parasitic folds shaped like “sea serpents.”

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23 November 2018

Friday fold: loopy limestone in Utah

The countryside near Provo, Utah yields a terrific Friday fold in an outcrop of Cambrian limestone.

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28 September 2018

Friday fold: Big Cottonwood Fm., Slate Canyon, Utah

It’s Friday and that means it’s time for a fold. Today we head to Cottonwood Canyon, Utah, with reader Octavia Spencer, for a lovely antiform.

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9 March 2018

Friday fold: Raplee Monocline

It’s Friday! Let’s head to Utah for a guest Friday fold photo – a river rat’s view of the Raplee Monocline!!

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11 December 2015

Friday fold: Nice gneiss from Salt Lake, Utah

Another guest Friday fold… this one from my colleague Tiffany Rivera of Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah, the one who brought you yesterday’s thrombolite pictures… Tiffany writes that these shots come from a man-made boulder field / berm along the lake. The boulders were these beautifully folded gneisses. Antelope Island exposes some of the oldest rocks in the Salt Lake valley, but I don’t know the geology out …

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9 December 2015

Thrombolites of the Great Salt Lake, Utah

I saw mention of thrombolites exposed along the shore of Antelope Island in the Great Salt Lake the other day in my Facebook feed; because the description cited a professor at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, I prompted my friend and colleague Tiffany Rivera, also a geology professor at Westminster, to go check it out and get me some bloggable photos. As it turned out, she already had – …

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10 February 2014

Refuge, by Terry Tempest Williams

When Michael Collier came to visit last year, he recommended a couple of books to me. I finally got around to reading the first of them – Refuge, a memoir mixed with natural history of Utah by Terry Tempest Williams. The arc of the story is essentially twofold: the women in Williams’ family get cancer, and get treated for cancer (mastectomies, chemo, nutritional supplements to negate the nausea of the …

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18 January 2014

Annotating some Zion cross-bedding

A photo of the iconic dune cross-beds at Zion National Park gets the Bentley Annotation treatment, and comes out looking like a stained glass window. Take a look at both photos and see if you can answer the question, “Which way was the wind blowing?”

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22 September 2011

More moki marbles

More moki marbles: little concretions in sandstone, kind of like the ones I showed you Tuesday from Illinois. But these ones are from the Navajo Sandstone, a late Triassic or early Jurassic erg deposit from the Colorado Plateau. These photos were taken in Zion National Park, near Springdale, Utah (real close to the cross-beds I featured a month ago). They are tougher than the sandstone in which they formed, and …

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21 August 2011

The best cross-bedding you’ll ever see

Setting aside the lack of scale, it really doesn’t get any better than that. Click through to make it huge. This is the Navajo Sandstone, early Jurassic (or late Triassic?) in age. It’s in Zion National Park, Utah. Wind direction was from the right towards the left, as these preserved slip-faces of ancient dunes indicate. The beds are right-side-up, and they have been differentially eroded, causing the cross-beds to jump …

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