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1 June 2018

Friday fold: a quartet from Marli Miller’s website

Marli Miller is a senior instructor at the University of Oregon. She is the author of Roadside Geology of Oregon and (with Darrel Cowan) Roadside Geology of Washington. She’s also a very talented geological photographer. She launched a website recently to showcase her work and make it available for instructors: Geology Pics. After chatting with Marli a bit in Flagstaff at the Rocky Mountain / Cordilleran section meetings of GSA …

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7 May 2018

2/3 pass rate on determining geopetal “up”

A visual challenge via Twitter to determine stratigraphic younging direction ends with equivocal results. So let’s use GIGAmacro imagery to school your sedimentological students on how three primary sedimentary structures look different right-side-up versus up-side-down.

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20 April 2018

Friday fold: Isoclinal in Damaraland

A guest Friday fold from Graham Andrews of West Virginia University: Graham describes this as an almost along axis view of a huge isocline in the Damaraland belt, Namibia Thanks for sharing! And a happy Friday to all.

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10 April 2018

An outcrop showcasing a strand of the Kentucky River Fault System

Roadcuts in Kentucky show Ordovician limestones of two distinct types, replete with fossils and primary sedimentary structures, and juxtaposed by a fault, one strand in the Kentucky River Fault System.

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6 April 2018

Friday fold: “wrecumbent in Wrangellia”

Darrel Cowan of the University of Washington has pitched in a Friday fold. Check this lovely scene out: Darrel says this is a recumbent fold in the Upper Triassic Nizina and Chitistone limestones. I took the photo when I worked for Shell in 1973 or 1974. I’m pretty sure it is on the west wall of the canyon occupied by the Root Glacier, several kilometers NW of McCarthy, Alaska. The …

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14 March 2018

New media to show off exemplary features of the Devonian-aged Hampshire Formation along Corridor H, West Virginia

Last week, I was in Morgantown, West Virginia, to deliver a colloquium talk to the geology department at West Virginia University of geological visualization. The next day, I took some time on the way home to geologize a bit on the road called Corridor H, a gorgeous transect through the eastern Allegheny Plateau and western Valley & Ridge provinces. I focused that day on the Hampshire Formation, Foreknobs Formation, and …

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9 March 2018

Friday fold: Raplee Monocline

It’s Friday! Let’s head to Utah for a guest Friday fold photo – a river rat’s view of the Raplee Monocline!!

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1 March 2018

A GIGAmacro view of a cool outcrop in Scotland

As noted previously, the old way of viewing gigapixel imagery is no more. But there is a new, better way. The GIGAmacro company has a better viewing platform that can be used either with images uploaded to their server or  with pre-existing images that currently “live” at GigaPan.com. Here’s an example: a roadcut of limestone of the Grudaidh Formation (Durness Group) in the Northwest Highlands of Scotland, near Ardvreck Castle, …

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23 January 2018

A kid and his slicks

On a family hike, Callan’s son finds some interesting smooth lines on a rock. What are they? What do they tell us? Tune in for a brief history of Appalachian geology.

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12 January 2018

Friday folds: Hayden Butte (“A Mountain”), Tempe

In keeping with the Arizonarific theme of this week’s posts (thanks to my participation in the 2018 Structural Geology and Tectonics Forum), I thought I would wrap up my ‘geology of the Phoenix area‘ posts with a walk I took on my last day there. This was to what Google Maps calls “Hayden Butte,” but the locals call “A Mountain.” Not “a mountain,” but “the mountain called ‘A‘.” It has …

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