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28 September 2016

Virginia Museum of Natural History specimens in GIGAmacro view

One of the small sub-projects of my 2015-2017 Chancellor’s Commonwealth Professorship is to create some GIGAmacro images of cool fossil specimens from the Virginia Museum of Natural History in Martinsville. Curator of paleontology Alex Hastings was good enough to loan us a few specimens to image, and hopefully there will soon be more where they came from. Here are three examples: a fossil plant, and two fossil vertebrates: Strobilus cone …

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22 September 2016

Eyes on some augens in a nice gneiss

Eyes on some augens in a nice gneiss

Take a look at these gorgeous exposures of augen gneiss in eastern “mainland” Shetland, U.K. Includes 3 GigaPans of the site.

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20 September 2016

A virtual field trip to examine the Peninsula Sandstone on Table Mountain

A virtual field trip to examine the Peninsula Sandstone on Table Mountain

Take a virtual field trip to Table Mountain, near Cape Town, South Africa. Digital media to explore from the site include: a 3D model, 3 GigaPans, and a 360° spherical photo!

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14 September 2016

Pillows in Icelandic basalts

Pillows in Icelandic basalts

Time is short these days, but I know you hanker for amazing geology. How about some pillow basalts from the Snæfellsnes* Peninsula, far western Iceland? Note the cm-demarcated pencil for scale. See if you can find it in the GigaPan version below: Link Handheld GigaPan by Callan Bentley, stitched with Microsoft ICE _________________________ * “Snay full snooze”

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9 September 2016

Friday folds: A study in contrasts at the Walls Boundary Fault, Shetland

Friday folds: A study in contrasts at the Walls Boundary Fault, Shetland

A virtual field trip to the Walls Boundary Fault in Shetland reveals an embarrassment of Friday fold riches.

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3 September 2016

Viewing the Sea Point migmatite through the lens of GigaPan

Viewing the Sea Point migmatite through the lens of GigaPan

It was five years ago when I first visited Sea Point, the outcrop on the coast of the Cape Peninsula where the Cape Granite (~540 Ma) intrudes the (meta-)sedimentary rocks of the Malmesbury Group. The outcrop is (a) beautiful and evocative, and (b) of historical importance, as Charles Darwin visited it while on the voyage of the Beagle, contemplating and confirming Lyell’s assertions of the validity of plutonism as he …

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1 September 2016

Archean microbial mats in the news and in GigaPan

Archean microbial mats in the news and in GigaPan

The news yesterday of 3.7 Ga stromatolites in Greenland prompts a closer look at 3.22 Ga microbially-induced sedimentary structures in the Barberton Greenstone Belt’s Moodies group sandstones.

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30 August 2016

Northwest Highlands unconformities (3 of 3): Sub-Ardvreck

Northwest Highlands unconformities (3 of 3): Sub-Ardvreck

It’s time to cover the third and final unconformity I observed this summer in the North-West Highlands of Scotland: the unconformity between the Neoproterozoic Torridonian Group below and the Cambrian Ardvreck Group above. Where I saw it, south of Loch Assynt on the mountain called Canisp, it actually is displayed alongside the sub-Torridonian unconformity. The mountain hosts a “double unconformity”! Here is a view, looking south: The bottom of the …

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16 August 2016

Northwest Highlands unconformities (1 of 3): Sub-Stoer Group

Northwest Highlands unconformities (1 of 3): Sub-Stoer Group

First in a series profiling the three unconformities to be found in the North-West Highlands of Scotland. Today: the sub-Stoer unconformity as exposed at Clachtoll. Explore a Proterozoic buried topography topped with coarse, angular breccia.

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2 August 2016

Oldest fossils in the UK: M.I.S.S. in Stoer Group, Scotland

Oldest fossils in the UK: M.I.S.S. in Stoer Group, Scotland

This is the Split Rock at Clachtoll, on the shore of the North-West Highlands of Scotland. You’re looking out to sea, over the Minch. It’s the site that graces the cover of the excellent book A Geological Excursion Guide to the North-West Highlands of Scotland, by Kathryn Goodenough and Marten Krabbendam. “Clach toll” apparently means “Split rock” — Go figure. The Split Rock is an easy landmark to steer toward …

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