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You are browsing the archive for 2015 September.

26 September 2015

A History of the World in Six Glasses, by Tom Standage

This week’s book was a survey of human history, from the dawn of civilization to the Cold War, of the various ways that societal, health, political, technological, and economic factors drove the adoption of various beverages, and how the presence of those beverages in human society generated ripples of cause and effect, propelling advances and turns of history that led us to the world we live in. It’s a prime …

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25 September 2015

Friday fold: Macro GigaPan of Archean gneiss, Spanish Peaks, Montana

I don’t think I’ve featured this sample here before… It’s a lovely gneiss from near the trailhead for the Spanish Peaks, near Ted Turner’s Ranch in the Gallatin/Madison Range in southern Montana, not too far from Big Sky. Have fun checking it out in this macro GigaPan: link Happy Friday to all.

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22 September 2015

New LiDAR of the Fort Valley & surrounding area

New LiDAR imagery for the Fort Valley reveals bedrock structures and subtle aspects of fluvial geomorphology.

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21 September 2015

Assassination Vacation, by Sarah Vowell

Time for my book report: This week, I read (well, listened to) a fun history of the assassination of three American presidents. Yes, it’s simultaneously about political murder and is a fun read (well, listen). This is because of the author’s ideal mix of snark, intelligence, and obsession with the three stories discussed herein: the assassination of Lincoln, McKinley, and Garfield. She doesn’t get into Kennedy’s assassination – perhaps because …

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14 September 2015

Awesome field trips at GSA Baltimore meeting

Hi everyone, As the deadline for early registration for the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America nears, I’d like to call your attention to a suite of awesome field trips exploring mid-Atlantic region geology. If you’re traveling to the east coast for the first time for GSA, or if you’ve never ventured beyond the Smithsonian and NSF conference rooms, then you should consider one of these trips as …

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12 September 2015

New GigaPans from Team M.A.G.I.C.

Hampshire Formation outcrops on Corridor H, West Virginia: link (Marissa Dudek) link (Callan Bentley) Faults in the Tonoloway Formation, Corridor H, West Virginia: link (Marissa Dudek) Conococheague Formation, showing stromatolites and cross-bedding: link (Callan Bentley) link (Jeffrey Rollins) Tiny folds and faults, from a sample I collected somewhere, sometime… oh well, it’s cool regardless: link (Robin Rohrback) Fern fossil in Llewellyn Formation, St. Clair, Pennsylvania: link (Robin Rohrback) Cross-bedding in …

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4 September 2015

Faults aren’t lines

A new post on GeoSpace, a sister blog here at the AGU Blogosphere, calls attention to a new study by Simon Lamb and colleagues on the plate-boundary fault running through New Zealand’s South Island, the Alpine Fault. The post is apparently taken and lightly adapted from a press release on the Victoria University of Wellington website, where it was authored by a “communications adviser.” I call your attention to it …

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Friday fold: Prins Christian Sund, Greenland

This Friday, we are off looking for folds in South Greenland. Care to join?

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2 September 2015

The Liar’s Club, by Mary Karr

I just finished this excellent memoir by Mary Karr, mostly about her childhood, mostly in east Texas. It’s not explicitly geological but it does feature an oil town economy and a hurricane, as well as some consideration of the Rocky Mountain Front Range in Colorado. I didn’t read it out of any illusions it would be geological, though – I selected it from the library shelf more from a desire …

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