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4 June 2020

Hydrologists show environmental damage from fog reduction is observable from outer space

A new paper presents the first clear evidence that the relationship between fog levels and vegetation status is measurable using remote sensing. The discovery opens up the potential to easily and rapidly assess fog’s impact on ecological health across large land masses — as compared to painstaking ground-level observation.

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18 May 2020

How climate killed corals

New study shows multiple factors joined forces to devastate the Great Barrier Reef in 2016.

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12 May 2020

New evidence of watery plumes on Jupiter’s moon Europa

Scientists are keen to explore beneath Europa’s thick blanket of ice, and they can do so indirectly by hunting for evidence of activity emanating from below. A new study published in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters, did exactly this.

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Sounding Saturn’s depths with its seismic icy rings

The secrets of Saturn’s veiled interior are leaking out by way of the planet’s spectacular rings, according to a line of research that has taken four decades to come to fruition. In the last few years, what was first considered a sort of wacky hypothesis – that scientists can use Saturn’s rings to learn about  its structure — has turned into a singular window into Saturn’s surprisingly fluid and leviathan depths.

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6 May 2020

Going against the trend

Global warming has affected the entire planet’s surface, except for one particular area of the ocean, which until 2015 had bucked the trend. A research team has now unraveled what was going on.

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27 April 2020

New Mexico badlands help researchers understand past Martian lava flows (video)

An aerial view of the McCartys flow field in western New Mexico, which is twice the size of Washington, D.C. Cracks in the rock show how the lava shrank as it cooled. Inflation pits can also be seen: pits that formed when the lava flowed and inflated around an obstacle. Credit: Christopher Hamilton.

Planetary scientists are using a volcanic flow field in New Mexico to puzzle out how long past volcanic eruptions on Mars might have lasted, a finding that could help researchers determine if Mars was ever hospitable to life. People don’t usually think of New Mexico as a volcanically active place, but it has some of the youngest (geologically speaking) large lava flows in the continental United States.

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23 April 2020

Promising signs for Perseverance rover in its quest for past Martian life

New research indicates river delta deposits within Mars’ Jezero crater – the destination of NASA’ Perseverance rover – formed over time scales that promoted habitability and enhanced preservation of evidence.

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21 April 2020

South Asia faces increased double-threat of extreme heat, extreme pollution

Extreme heat occurrences worldwide have increased in recent decades, and at the same time, many cities are facing severe air pollution problems, featuring episodes of high particulate matter pollution. This study provides an integrated assessment of human exposure to rare days of both extreme heat and high PM levels.

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Continued carbon dioxide emissions will impair human cognition

Rising CO2 causes more than a climate crisis—it may directly harm our ability to think.

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16 April 2020

Dust devils may roam hydrocarbon dunes on Saturn’s moon Titan

Hazy, orange Titan, Saturn's largest moon, passes in front of the planet and its rings in this tru-color image from Casssini. Credit: NASA

Smoggy, with a chance of dust devils: conditions at the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan may spawn convective whirlwinds By Liza Lester Meteorological conditions on Saturn’s large moon Titan, the strange, distant world that may be the most Earth-like in the solar system, appear conducive to the formation of dust devils, according to new research in AGU’s journal Geophysical Research Letters. If true, these dry whirlwinds may be primary movers …

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