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14 November 2019

Size of thunderstorm dome clouds may predict tornado intensity

The size of a bulge at the top of a thunderstorm’s anvil-shaped cloud may allow researchers to forecast the strength of tornadoes that spawn from such storms, according to a new study in AGU’s journal Geophysical Research Letters.

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12 November 2019

With Mars methane mystery unsolved, Curiosity serves scientists a new one: Oxygen

Sunset at the Viking Lander 1 Site on Mars. Credit: NASA/JPL.

For the first time in the history of space exploration, scientists have measured the seasonal changes in the gases that fill the air directly above the surface of Gale Crater on Mars. As a result, they noticed something baffling: oxygen, the gas many Earth creatures use to breathe, behaves in a way that so far scientists cannot explain through any known chemical processes.

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11 November 2019

Advancing spring warmth could disrupt species migration, development

In a new study in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters, scientists found that in many areas of the U.S. springtime temperature thresholds important for plant and animal life cycles occur between six to 20 days earlier in the season than they did 70 years ago.

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5 November 2019

Satellite tracking shows how ships affect clouds and climate

By matching the movement of ships to the changes in clouds caused by their emissions, researchers have shown how strongly the two are connected.

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23 October 2019

Radio noise maps show where emergency communications could get tricky

Rather than riding in trucks to maneuver around the streets of Boston, the team got in their steps. They carried radiofrequency monitoring equipment in backpacks sporting a towering radio antenna, a recording device and an aluminum “radio-proof box” containing a laptop – a key feature to prevent the computer from contaminating their data. In total, the contraption weighed 15.4 kilograms (34 pounds).

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16 October 2019

Ancient Moon rock provides evidence of giant lunar impact 4.3 billion years ago

An Apollo 16 lunar rock sample shows evidence of intense meteorite bombardment on the Moon 4.3 billion years ago, according to new research. The results provide new insights for the Moon’s early history, showing lunar impacts were common throughout the Moon’s formation than previously thought.

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15 October 2019

Radioactive chlorine from nuclear bomb tests still present in Antarctica

New research finds some glaciers in Antarctica are still releasing radioactive chlorine-36 created during 1950s nuclear weapons tests. Credit: NASA/Joe MacGregor.

Antarctica’s ice sheets are still releasing radioactive chlorine from marine nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s, a new study finds. This suggests regions in Antarctica store and vent the radioactive element differently than previously thought. The results also improve scientists’ ability to use chlorine to learn more about Earth’s atmosphere.

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4 October 2019

Extreme solar storms may be more frequent than previously thought

New research in AGU’s journal Space Weather indicates storms like the 1859 Carrington Event are not as rare as scientists thought and could happen every few decades, seriously damaging modern communication and navigation systems around the globe.

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3 October 2019

Shape of volcanic ash influences contamination of water sources in volcanically active regions

Contaminants from volcanic eruptions leach into water at different rates depending on the shape of the volcanic ash particles, according to new research that could enhancing scientists’ ability to predict water quality risk in volcanically active regions.

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1 October 2019

Water distribution affects exoplanets’ habitable zone

A new study finds land planets, which have equal to or less than 10 percent of the volume of Earth’s water, can remain habitable at a closer distance to their host star if most of their water is at the planet’s poles. This means the habitable zone for these types of planets may be different than previously assumed.

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