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16 October 2017

Waves in lakes make waves in the Earth

Scientists at the University of Utah report that small seismic signals emanating from lakes can aid science. As a record of wave motion in a lake, they can reveal when a lake freezes over and when it thaws. And as a small, constant source of seismic energy in the surrounding earth, lake microseisms can shine a light on the geology surrounding a lake.

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The missing mass — what is causing a geoid low in the Indian Ocean?

In a recent study, scientists explored the reasons behind the existence of the Indian Ocean Geoid Low, a point of low gravity found just south of the Indian peninsula.

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11 October 2017

Secrets of hidden ice canyons revealed

In a new study, scientists have discovered huge canyons cutting through the underbelly of Antarctica’s ice shelves, meaning they may be more fragile than previously thought. Thanks to the CryoSat and Sentinel-1 missions, new light is being shed on this hidden world.

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6 October 2017

Old Faithful’s geological heart revealed

Old Faithful is Yellowstone National Park’s most famous landmark. Millions of visitors come to the park every year to see the geyser erupt every 44-125 minutes. But despite Old Faithful’s fame, relatively little was known about the geologic anatomy of the structure and the fluid pathways that fuel the geyser below the surface. Until now.

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4 October 2017

Melbourne and Sydney should prepare for 50-degree Celsius days

A new study warns that Melbourne and Sydney should prepare for 50-degree Celsius (122-degree Fahrenheit) summer days under the Paris Agreement global warming limit of 2 degrees Celsius (4 degrees Fahrenheit). The new study assessed the potential magnitude of future extreme temperatures in Australia under Paris targets of an increase in global temperatures of 1.5 and 2 degrees Celsius (3 and 4 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels.

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New study explains how continents leave their roots behind

In some areas of the seafloor, a tectonic mystery lies buried deep underground. The ocean floor contains some of the newest rock on Earth, but underneath these young oceanic plates are large swatches of much older continents that have been dislocated from their continental plates and overtaken by the younger, denser oceanic plate. Researchers have been puzzled by this phenomenon for some time: how does a continental plate leave some of itself behind?

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26 September 2017

Warming climate could increase bacterial impacts on Chesapeake Bay shellfish, recreation

Researchers have found that three common species of Vibrio bacteria in the Chesapeake Bay could increase with changing climate conditions by the end of this century, resulting in significant economic and healthcare costs from illnesses caused by exposure to contaminated water and consumption of contaminated shellfish.

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25 September 2017

New study may help identify areas with and without accessible water ice on Mars

New findings reveal deposits on Mars that could be interpreted to be ice-rich may contain little or no ice at all, based on an analysis of radar sounder data for Meridiani Planum—an area on the planet’s equator being explored by the Opportunity rover. This new insight into Meridiani Planum may help identify areas with and without accessible water ice, a resource critical to future human exploration and possible colonization of Mars.

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20 September 2017

Tracking driftwood gives researchers insight into past Arctic Ocean changes

Wood from trees that fell into Arctic-draining rivers thousands of years ago is giving scientists a detailed look at how Arctic Ocean circulation has changed over the past 12,000 years. In a new study, researchers used nearly 1,000 pieces of driftwood collected from Arctic shorelines since the 1950s to track Arctic sea ice extent and ocean circulation since the start of the Holocene.

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19 September 2017

Researchers take on atmospheric effects of Arctic snowmelt

Researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute are exploring the changing chemistry of the Arctic’s atmosphere to help answer the question of what happens as snow and ice begin to melt. The research is concerned with the Arctic’s reactive bromine season, the period of time when bromine is consuming ozone, producing bromine monoxide and oxidizing mercury.

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