26 April 2017

New study challenges long-held tsunami formation theory (plus video)

New study challenges long-held tsunami formation theory (plus video)

A new study is challenging a long-held theory that tsunamis form and acquire their energy mostly from vertical movement of the seafloor. The finding validates an approach developed by researchers that uses GPS technology to detect a tsunami’s size and strength for early warnings.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



Sea level rising faster now than during 1990s, new study shows

Sea level rising faster now than during 1990s, new study shows

Global mean sea level is rising 25 percent faster now than it did during the late 20th century largely due to increased melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet, a new study shows. Satellites first started measuring sea level rise in 1993. The new study revisits how well these measurements agree with independently observed changes in the various components contributing to sea level rise.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



24 April 2017

Study finds pond expansion a significant factor in loss of Mississippi delta land

Study finds pond expansion a significant factor in loss of Mississippi delta land

Wind-driven expansion of marsh ponds on the Mississippi River Delta is a significant factor in the loss of crucial land in the Delta region, according to new research. The study found 17 percent of land loss in the area resulted from pond expansion, much of it caused by waves that eroded away the edges of the pond.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



18 April 2017

Mercury’s craters offer clues to planet’s contraction

Mercury’s craters offer clues to planet’s contraction

Craters serve as time-markers for the faults because they can be dated by how degraded they appear. The more degraded looking craters are older. Those that have sharper features are younger, and those with bright rays of debris radiating around them are youngest of all.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



17 April 2017

Why can we see and hear meteors at the same time?

Why can we see and hear meteors at the same time?

Light travels nearly a million times faster than sound. But for thousands of years, humans have reported hearing some meteors as they pass overhead, puzzling scientists for decades. Now, a new study puts forth a simple explanation for the phenomenon.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



13 April 2017

Researchers unravel drivers of large iceberg movement

Researchers unravel drivers of large iceberg movement

Researchers have succeeded in modeling how Antarctic icebergs drift through the Southern Ocean, and in identifying the physical factors behind their movement and their melting. Which factors are most important tends to depend on the size of the iceberg in question

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



12 April 2017

One-fifth of world’s population depends on food imports

One-fifth of world’s population depends on food imports

Countries unable to feed their growing populations are increasingly importing food to meet demand, a new study finds. Nearly half of the world’s population lives in areas where imports compensate for food scarcity and one-fifth of the world now depends upon these imports to survive, according to the new study.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



11 April 2017

Researchers find mushrooms may hold clues to effect of carbon dioxide on lawns

Researchers find mushrooms may hold clues to effect of carbon dioxide on lawns

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire set out to determine how rising carbon dioxide concentrations and different climates may alter vegetation like forests, croplands, and 40 million acres of American lawns. They found that the clues may lie in an unexpected source, mushrooms.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



10 April 2017

O marks the spot for magnetic reconnection

O marks the spot for magnetic reconnection

ESA’s Cluster mission is challenging the current view of magnetic reconnection – the breaking and immediate rearrangement of magnetic field lines in the collision of two plasma flows. According to a new study, most of the energy dissipated during a reconnection event is not released at the crossings, or X-lines, between the two plasma flows but rather in swirling vortices, or O-lines, where magnetic field lines bundle up and spiral together. The new finding, which contradicts the accepted consensus, is an important step in the process of understanding the mechanisms that accelerate particles in space plasma.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



7 April 2017

Scientists uncover isotopic fingerprint of nitrous oxide emissions from Arctic tundra

Scientists uncover isotopic fingerprint of nitrous oxide emissions from Arctic tundra

A new study presents, for the first time, the isotopic fingerprint of nitrous oxide produced by Arctic soils. The finding opens new avenues for predicting future trends in atmospheric nitrous oxide as well as in identifying climate change mitigation actions in the Arctic, a region that is particularly sensitive to climate change.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>