3 February 2016

Study shows North Atlantic Ocean carbon storage doubled over last decade

Study shows North Atlantic Ocean carbon storage doubled over last decade

A new study shows that the North Atlantic Ocean absorbed 50 percent more man-made carbon dioxide over the last decade, compared to the previous decade. The findings show the impact that the burning of fossil fuels have had on the world’s oceans in just 10 years.

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2 February 2016

Increase in volcanic eruptions at the end of the ice age caused by melting ice caps and glacial erosion

Increase in volcanic eruptions at the end of the ice age caused by melting ice caps and glacial erosion

The combination of erosion and melting ice caps led to a massive increase in volcanic activity at the end of the last ice age, according to new research. As the climate warmed, the ice caps melted, decreasing the pressure on the Earth’s mantle, leading to an increase in both magma production and volcanic eruptions. The researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, have found that erosion also played a major role in the process, and may have contributed to an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

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1 February 2016

Understanding the 2015–16 El Niño and its impact on phytoplankton

Understanding the 2015–16 El Niño and its impact on phytoplankton

This is part of a new series of posts that highlight the importance of Earth and space science data and its contributions to society. Posts in this series showcase data facilities and data scientists; explain how Earth and space science data is collected, managed and used; explore what this data tells us about the planet; and delve into the challenges and issues involved in managing and using data. This series …

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25 January 2016

On Twitter, Oceanographers Show Deep Appreciation for Data-Collection Device

On Twitter, Oceanographers Show Deep Appreciation for Data-Collection Device

This is part of a new series of posts that highlight the importance of Earth and space science data and its contributions to society. Posts in this series showcase data facilities and data scientists; explain how Earth and space science data is collected, managed and used; explore what this data tells us about the planet; and delve into the challenges and issues involved in managing and using data. This series is intended to demystify Earth and space science data, and share how this data shapes our understanding of the world.

On Friday, while many people were tracking the progress of the winter storm bearing down on the eastern United States, oceanographers were rummaging through their fieldwork photos for images of CTDs to share on Twitter in honor of #CTDAppreciationDay.

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21 January 2016

Rapid warming over the Indian Ocean reduces marine productivity

Rapid warming over the Indian Ocean reduces marine productivity

Increasing water temperatures in the Indian Ocean are taking a toll on the marine ecosystem, according to our new study.

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20 January 2016

Going digital: Building a better geological map of Alaska

Going digital: Building a better geological map of Alaska

In the early 1900s, before Alaska was part of the United States, geologists roamed this northern territory on foot and horseback, noting its features and terrain on hand-drawn maps. Nearly 100 years later in 1996, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research geologist Frederic Wilson and a dozen colleagues undertook the task of using some of the information contained in these field notes, sketches and maps, along with many other sources of data, to create the first fully digitalized geological map of Alaska.

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19 January 2016

Researchers discover surprising waves in the Antarctic atmosphere

Researchers discover surprising waves in the Antarctic atmosphere

Researchers who have spent thousands of hours observing the atmosphere high above Antarctica have discovered a previously unknown class of wave that ripples constantly through the atmosphere, likely affecting high-level winds, climate, and even Earth-based communications systems.

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14 January 2016

Study finds high melt rates on Antarctica’s most stable ice shelf

Study finds high melt rates on Antarctica’s most stable ice shelf

A new study measured a melting rate that is 25 times higher than expected on one part of the Ross Ice Shelf. The study suggests that high, localized melt rates such as this one on Antarctica’s largest and most stable ice shelf are normal and keep Antarctica’s ice sheets in balance.

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Data Management Isn’t Optional; It’s Essential to Being Successful

Data Management Isn’t Optional; It’s Essential to Being Successful

This is part of a new series of posts that highlight the importance of Earth and space science data and its contributions to society. Posts in this series showcase data facilities and data scientists; explain how Earth and space science data is collected, managed and used; explore what this data tells us about the planet; and delve into the challenges and issues involved in managing and using data. This series is intended to demystify Earth and space science data, and share how this data shapes our understanding of the world.

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13 January 2016

Ocean circulation changes may have killed cold-water corals

Ocean circulation changes may have killed cold-water corals

Successive and abrupt changes in North Atlantic ocean circulation over the past 4,500 years seem to have caused major reductions in some cold-water coral ecosystems, finds a study published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

The new study shows changes in sea surface circulation over the last few thousand years were more sudden than previously thought and in some cases led to abrupt collapses of cold-water coral ecosystems. The researchers found the first evidence that perturbations in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) led to cold-water coral ecosystems decline from 100 to 1,200 years ago.

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