30 November 2016

Permafrost loss dramatically changes Yukon River chemistry

Permafrost loss dramatically changes Yukon River chemistry

Permafrost loss due to a warming Alaska is leading to changes in the chemistry of the Yukon River Basin with potential global climate implications. This is the first time a Yukon River study has been able to use long-term continuous water chemistry data to document hydrological changes over such an enormous geographic area and long time span.

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Little mine in Big Sur: Perpetuating mercury contamination in California’s Central Coast

Little mine in Big Sur: Perpetuating mercury contamination in California’s Central Coast

Wildfires can perpetuate mercury contamination by releasing it from soil and plants and spreading it through smoke and ash. It doesn’t take much heat to convert mercury to a gas.

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22 November 2016

Avalanches more complex than previously thought

Avalanches more complex than previously thought

Avalanches can throw up a powdery cloud of snow as they violently charge down mountains, obscuring their inner workings from scientists. But new observations of artificially-triggered avalanches in Switzerland’s Vallée de la Sionne have penetrated this powdery veil.

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18 November 2016

Older Mayan pyramid detected within Chichén Itzá

Older Mayan pyramid detected within Chichén Itzá

Scientists in Mexico have found evidence for a third and earlier—more purely Mayan—pyramid inside of the famous and iconic Pyramid of El Castillo at Chichén Itzá, in Yucatán. Using a non-destructive technique that employed hundred of electrodes deployed on the surface of the pyramid, the researchers also confirmed previous discoveries of a second pyramid, as well as their own 2014 discovery of a partially water-filled sinkhole beneath the pyramid.

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17 November 2016

Study finds widespread land losses from Gulf oil spill

Study finds widespread land losses from Gulf oil spill

A new study shows dramatic, widespread shoreline loss in Louisiana marshlands most heavily coated with oil during the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Following the spill, the length of shoreline that receded more than 13 feet (4 meters) a year quadrupled compared to the year before the spill. The land losses occurred mainly in areas where oil had washed ashore during the spill.

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16 November 2016

Global warming could reduce volcanic cooling effects on climate

Global warming could reduce volcanic cooling effects on climate

New research finds that as the climate warms, Earth’s atmosphere could trap more volcanic and plumes in the troposphere, the lower part of the atmosphere where weather happens. Volcanic aerosols that stay in the troposphere get washed out by precipitation in days or weeks.

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15 November 2016

New maps reveal safe locations for wastewater injection

New maps reveal safe locations for wastewater injection

Geophysicists have compiled the most detailed maps yet of the geologic forces controlling the locations, types and magnitudes of earthquakes in Texas and Oklahoma. These new “stress maps” provide insight into the nature of the faults associated with recent temblors, many of which appear to have been triggered by the injection of wastewater deep underground.

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3 November 2016

Rare molecule on Venus could shed light on planet’s weather

Rare molecule on Venus could shed light on planet’s weather

Scientists’ keen detective work may have solved one of Venus’s oldest secrets: why the planet’s atmosphere absorbs ultraviolet light of a specific frequency. The new findings could help scientists better understand Venus’s thick atmosphere and its heat-trapping clouds, according to the study’s authors.

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2 November 2016

Vehicle emission control strategies differ in U.S. and Europe

Vehicle emission control strategies differ in U.S. and Europe

The United States and the European Union take markedly different approaches to vehicle emissions controls, and the evidence is in the air, according to a new study. The work shows distinct differences in vehicle pollution trends in U.S. megacities, where regulations tend to target air quality, and European ones, where the target tends to be greenhouse gases.

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25 October 2016

Stone walls, railway lines and carbon fibers record Turkey’s westward drift

Stone walls, railway lines and carbon fibers record Turkey’s westward drift

A new study finds movement of North Anatolian fault may provide clues to future earthquakes.

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