5 May 2016

Changing science culture by contributing to open science

Changing science culture by contributing to open science

Like other scientific communities, the Earth and space science community has an opportunity to improve.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



4 May 2016

Imaging the Deep Sea

Imaging the Deep Sea

Thanks to the fast advances in technology, we have now the ability to take very high definition photos in the deep sea. The quality of these images is so high that it is possible to identify any organism big enough to be visible to the naked eye. Therefore, these images can be used identify species assemblages on hydrothermal vent and document changes in their composition over time.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



3 May 2016

Scientists find likely cause for recent southeast U.S. earthquakes

Scientists find likely cause for recent southeast U.S. earthquakes

The southeastern United States should has seen some notable seismic events – most recently, the 2011 magnitude-5.8 earthquake near Mineral, Virginia that shook the nation’s capital. Now, scientists report in a new study a likely explanation for this unusual activity: pieces of the mantle under this region have been periodically breaking off and sinking down into the Earth.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (1)>>



29 April 2016

April Data Digest

April Data Digest

Three stories published during April describe the ways remotely sensed data and machine learning are changing how Earth is studied and understood; while a fourth shows the beauty of our planet through images captured by one of the satellites imaging the Earth.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



Too Hot To Handle?

Too Hot To Handle?

There’s a reason why people are hesitant to walk over burning coals. Barring those who have congenital analgesia, everyone can feel heat, and unless you live above the Arctic Circle like me, it is not a feeling we often relish. In fact, heat sensitivity can invoke serious fear and has fueled mankind’s most sadistic tortures and punishments. Nonetheless, it is vital for survival. Because we can sense heat, we can avoid it and prevent harming our bodies.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



28 April 2016

New study explains source of mysterious radar echoes

New study explains source of mysterious radar echoes

After 50 years, scientists think they may have cracked one of atmospheric science’s most persistent mysteries. Every day at dawn, an unknown phenomenon appears. Radar waves bounce off of it and return to radar receivers like an echo. Now, a pair of researchers at Boston University hypothesize that the sun could be causing the inexplicable echoes.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



27 April 2016

All Aboard!

All Aboard!

Much like the deep sea hydrothermal vents we study, no light penetrates into the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) control room. Here, the ROPOS team operates the submersible, helping scientists collect samples and conduct analyses. Working 12-hour shifts, a ROPOS pilot may spend a full day in this room, lit only by glow of ~22 computer screens showing video feeds of all the cameras mounted on ROPOS used to navigate and observe the deep sea.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



Back Again

Back Again

Over a decade ago, we established 19 long-term study sites in four different vent fields here on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center. We placed small, floating markers on each of these sites in the hope that one day we would return to see how they had (or had not) changed. And now, here I am again, floating over our long-term study sites and preparing to launch the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to visit one of my favorite environments on the planet: an active hydrothermal vent field.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



26 April 2016

Idling diesel engines may produce dangerous pollutant

Idling diesel engines may produce dangerous pollutant

New research finds exhaust from idling diesel engines produces a significant amount of isocyanic acid when photons from sunlight help it react with other compounds in the atmosphere. The amount of this secondary photochemical isocyanic acid produced by non-road, idling diesel engines, like those in tractors, loaders, and other heavy construction and farm equipment, was 50 to 230 milligrams per kilogram of diesel burned.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



22 April 2016

Among Waves and Whirlwinds: A Mid-Cruise Account

Among Waves and Whirlwinds: A Mid-Cruise Account

On the morning of the 19th, the R/V Falkor entered harbor in the country of Tonga after nearly 12 days at sea. As we stood on the deck watching the dockworkers heave lines to and fro, several scientists breathed a sigh of relief, for we had spent a number of days being tossed around by the sea.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>