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14 June 2018

Up-Goer 5 at #AGU18 – submit your abstract early!

By Shane M Hanlon One of our favorite parts of our annual meeting is the Up-Goer 5 session that we host. Every year, scientists explain their research using the 1000 (ten-hundred) most common words in the English language. The results are fun, silly, heartfelt, surprising, and overall a great time. We’re doing it again this year and we want YOU to submit an abstract. Here’s the session: ED055: The Up-Goer …

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29 May 2018

Webinars for scicomm: Consider me a convert

I thought webinars were basically lectures online, and don’t get me wrong, they can be. But I quickly realized that they can also be, and are, a great tool to share content and engage with audiences who normally wouldn’t be able to participate in person.

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14 May 2018

The humans behind climate science – a podcast

“I’m too busy,” I said to myself. “I should be writing papers,” I protested. Nevertheless, the idea wouldn’t go away. It refused to die.

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7 May 2018

Communicating about rare and common species

On March 19, in a grassy enclosure at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, a northern white rhinoceros named Sudan died. He was the last of his kind.

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26 March 2018

Building a scicomm program from the salt marsh up

As a scientist whose research required lying face-down in muddy salt marshes to search for itty-bitty marine snail eggs, I was often asked by casual onlookers, “Why the heck are you doing THAT?”

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13 March 2018

WATCH: Up-Goer 5 at AGU17!

Every year, scientists explain their research using the 1000 (ten-hundred) most common words in the English language. The results are fun, silly, heartfelt, surprising, and overall a great time.

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26 February 2018

True, personal science stories at AGU17

At AGU17, we took a break from the lectures and posters for an evening of inspiring stories about how science affects all of us in our everyday lives.

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5 February 2018

Science doesn’t speak for itself. The IPCC agrees.

By Shane M Hanlon Our job in Sharing Science is to help scientists communicate more effectively. Turns out that we’re not the only ones who understand the value of this endeavor. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recognizes that “…climate change doesn’t communicate itself.” So, they’ve released a pretty great guide. Of note, they touch on six main principles: Be a confident communicator Talk about the real world, not abstract …

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31 January 2018

A Change of Climate: Part 2

By Sam Illingworth Following on from my previous post, in which I described the process of curating a book of poetry about climate change, I would now like to share with you a collection of the poems that feature in A Change of Climate. Some of the poems in this collection are sad, some of them are funny, and some of them like ‘We are no longer interested in the …

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29 January 2018

A Change of Climate: Part 1

By Sam Illingworth Climate change is real. It is happening now. It affects all of us. And the only way that we can mitigate its effects in a meaningful fashion is to take collective action. Part of the challenge that we face in mobilising this collective action is in convincing people from currently less affected areas that climate change is right now, this second, responsible for the destruction of thousands …

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