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6 January 2023

#AntarcticLog: Happy New Year!

The South Pole is as mysterious to me as it is to you. I rely on other people’s stories to get a sense of what it’s like.  This one’s from Guy Guthridge, and I appreciate it. Even more, I appreciate Guy, who founded the National Science Foundation’s Antarctic Artists and Writers program. I’m always looking for ways to get back to the ice — in person or through stories like this. 

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9 December 2022

#AntarcticLog: Beyond the “Wall”

Yes, I’m shocked each time I see a scientist take time to get interviewed by someone debunking a false claim about climate change, Antarctica, space, you name it. Besides debunking the debunking, my contribution this week is a look back at just a few #AntarcticLog comics that focus on the work of scientists who worked in Antarctic’s interior.  

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28 November 2022

Excitement! Adventure! Sharing Science at #AGU22

Check out events on science communication, policy, art, multimedia, storytelling, and more at AGU22 (AGU’s Fall Meeting).

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18 November 2022

#AntarcticLog: Under the Sheet

Artist Karen Romano Young explores some of the secrets of the Antarctic ice sheet and how science helps reveal them.

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4 November 2022

#AntarcticLog: Trick of treat for UNICEF?

On Halloween I was doing a little research on Vanessa Nakate, the Ugandan climate change activist, and learned that she has become a spokesperson for Unicef.  Halloween… Unicef… climate and hunger? I switched gears quickly to create this trick-or-treat comic with a nod to my own early activist past. 

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5 August 2022

#AntarcticLog: Greetings from the Puerto Rico Trench

Greetings from the deepest place in the Atlantic Ocean!  So far I’m reporting from the surface, but every day human-operated vehicle (HOV) Alvin carries scientists deeper. I mean, if you knew you had access to 99% of the seafloor — where before you had access to 2/3 — wouldn’t you head for the deepest spots?

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15 July 2022

#AntarcticLog: Summertime

By Karen Romano Young The question of summer Arctic ice extent is up in the air — not to say it’s unknown.  NASA goes to extra effort to assure the detailed accuracy of its measurements, including a new effort beginning this summer.  Given the 40-plus-year coverage from space provided by the ICESat satellites, including ICESat-2, placed in orbit in 2018,  our understanding of the volume of sea ice is exquisite any time …

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8 July 2022

#AntarcticLog: Invisible Volcanoes

Artist Karen Roman Young shows us what we can learn about the below-ice geology of Marie Byrd Land in Antarctica.

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3 June 2022

#AntarcticLog: Headed for Hawaii

Serendipity? My tickets to the big island of Hawaii were already bought when I read that the international nonprofit organization Mission Blue had designated its 141st Hope Spot — Hawaii’s second — right where I was headed. For the next couple of weeks, I’ll be learning about — and posting about — the changes taking place on Kahalu’u Bay.  

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29 April 2022

#AntarcticLog: A small piece about a big deal

Artist Karen Romano Young explains through SciArt why tiny krill are a big deal for Antarctic food webs (and penguins, seals, orcas–and scientists).

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