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15 May 2020

#AGURocks: Geologise Theatre – All the world’s a stage!

I am a PhD student in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Oxford (UK) and one half of the musical science communication duo Geologise Theatre. We (Matthew Kemp, a fellow PhD student, and myself) write and perform songs and theatre pieces about the science of the Earth, from fossils to climate change! Shakespeare famously wrote “All the world’s a stage”, and we’ve taken that (perhaps too) literally…

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20 April 2020

Virtual Reality in Climate Adaptation and Community Engagement

As coastal communities worldwide contend with sea level rise, coastal erosion, and other impacts of climate change, a critical piece of the puzzle has become educating stakeholders in highly creative, insightful and practical ways that inspire equitable action.

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9 March 2020

Storytelling basics: The meat and ornaments of a story

Did you ever have a great idea, start that idea, then life hits you and that idea gets sidelined? That’s what happened w/ this series. But, I’m back, and there’s so much more storytelling to talk about!

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2 March 2020

Dinosaurs Under the Tundra, Part 2: Talking about Climate Change with a Climate Skeptic

As a recap; home for Christmas holidays, having a nice conversation with my in-laws. My father-in-law’s wife voices skepticism about climate change. Part 1 of this blog talked about what I could learn from that skepticism, and how listening might guide future climate research.  Part 2, this part, is about how I could’ve shared some of the things I’ve learned about climate science.

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3 February 2020

Earth Observatory for Kids!

Satellites, stories, and hands-on science! Earth Observatory for Kids (EO Kids for short) ­is a free online publication that strives to share Earth science stories and data in a way that engages diverse young adults.

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21 January 2020

How do you know when it’s gonna blow? Two years of USGS participation in the Siskiyou Science Festival

For the past two years, the USGS has sent scientists to the Siskiyou Science Festival, which is held yearly in the largest nearby population center, Mt. Shasta City. The Festival has been an excellent opportunity to interact with CalVO stakeholders and maintain relationships with the communities around the volcano.

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6 January 2020

Help wanted: Advice on a Plain Language Summary

One thing that I love about AGU is that all of our journals accept Plain Langauge Summaries as part of journal submissions. We here in Sharing Science highlight some of the better ones that we see via the #SciSummary hashtag and offer a toolkit on crafting that perfect summary. And now, we’re happy to offer a home to solicit advice. 

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2 December 2019

SciComm, policy, and outreach at AGU19!

♩It’s the most, wonderful tiiiiiiiime, of the year! ♫ 

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20 November 2019

Having “The [Climate Change] Talk” with your family

Thanksgiving can be a time for food, football, and family. And sometimes…uncomfortable family chats, especially around science. We live in a nation where there are disconnects between understanding and acceptance of major scientific issues such as GMOs, evolution, vaccinations, and (especially relevant to AGU scientists) climate change.

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19 September 2019

Storytelling basics: The story arc

By Shane M Hanlon  All good stories have an arc.* A beginning, middle, end. The action goes up and down. The tension leads to twists and turns. So, what does the basic story arc look like? Well:   This is an arc. Or, at this point, it’s a line. The beginning of the arc is the beginning of the story. Set the scene: where are we? Who are the characters? …

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