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18 September 2020

Friday fan: Death Valley, California

Working up some new images for my free, online Historical Geology textbook, I annotated a photograph I took in March of this alluvial fan in southern Death Valley. The development of desert varnish on older parts of the fan shows their age visually in a quick and easy way of determining fan deposit sequence: I’ve been making a lot of these animated annotations as a way of conserving space in …

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31 July 2020

Friday fold: Two Mile Run Overlook

I spied an anticline last weekend while engaging in a day of solo geologizing along Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Park. At Two Mile Run Overlook, I gazed west toward the southern tip of Massanutten Mountain, and noted what appeared to be an anticline in the Blue Ridge foothills: Annotated: And here it is in Google Maps,  with the perspective rotated to looking ~along strike to the north, and I …

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22 May 2020

Friday fold: Anticline in Glacier National Park

Some web research led to a serendipitous discovery and further exploration. Wherever you’re sheltering in place, you don’t have a view that’s this grand. Slip away for a few moments to the high country of Montana’s Glacier National Park, where an anticline may be seen in the towering cliffs…

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27 March 2020

Friday fauxld: a false syncline in Titus Canyon

What day is it again? Hard to keep track in the days of raging coronavirus infections, but it is in fact Friday, which means that if you want a dose of the halcyon pre-COVID-19 days, you can enjoy this example of a false fold from Death Valley National Park’s Titus Canyon.

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20 March 2020

Friday fold: more folds from lower Titus Canyon

We are living in surreal times. It hardly seems possible, but a week ago this evening, I drove down the Las Vegas strip with my students, ogling at the glitz and spectacle and crowds. Now, a mere 7 days later, Vegas has been shuttered, and it’s been shuttered for days. We traveled freely through California and now a week later, everyone in the state is ordered to stay home. What …

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22 November 2019

Friday fold: Noonday Dolomite in Mosaic Canyon

Because I’m putting together a field course for spring break 2020 to Death Valley California, I was looking through old Death Valley photos this week, from the last time I went to that special place. It was seven years ago! How time flies… This one is in Mosaic Canyon, and was taken by my student Marcelo Arispe, a talented photographer as well as a talented geologist: By the standards of …

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27 July 2019

Offset limestone layers at Broom Point

Yesterday, I featured some folds from Broom Point, but there are also faults there. With the intriguing local limestone conglomerates providing easily-discernible marker beds, these apparently vertical faults are easy to spot. Here are three examples:

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26 July 2019

Friday folds: Broom Point, Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland

Here’s a look at some of the outcrops at Broom Point, within sight of the famous uplifted fjord called Western Brook Pond: The limestone beds here are Ordovician in age, and they dip to the east: In places through there are folds to be spotted in the beds:

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12 July 2019

Friday fold: Wiltondale, Newfoundland

Here is an outcrop of folded limestone along route 430 in Newfoundland, inside Gros Morne National Park, just west of the crossroads called Wiltondale: A detailed look at the left antiformal portion of the outcrop: A zoomed-in examination of the rightmost part, where a goopy looking synform resides: Just down the way, a second outcrop shows another fold with the same sense of asymmetry, on a smaller scale: Happy Friday …

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3 May 2019

Friday fold: Monarch Canyon

When a dike is subjected to shear, how does it deform? A guest Friday fold from Darrel Cowan of the University of Washington teaches a nice little lesson. Join the field trip in Monarch Canyon of Death Valley National Park…

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