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21 February 2018

Evidence of surprising ocean warming around Galápagos corals

The ocean around the Galápagos Islands has been warming since the 1970s, according to a new analysis of the natural temperature archives stored in coral reefs.

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24 January 2018

Rise in severity of hottest days outpaces global average temperature increase

While Earth’s average annual temperature has increased at a steady pace in recent decades, there has been an alarming jump in the severity of the hottest days of the year during that same period, with the most lethal effects in the world’s largest cities, a new study finds.

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Stored heat released from ocean largely responsible for recent streak of record hot years

Global temperatures spiked during the record warm years of 2014 to 2016 largely because El Niño released an unusually large amount of heat generated by greenhouse gas emissions and stored in the Pacific Ocean, a new study finds.

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Dust on snow controls springtime river rise in West

A new study has found that dust, not spring warmth, controls the pace of spring snowmelt that feeds the headwaters of the Colorado River.

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22 January 2018

American lobsters feeling the heat in the northwest Atlantic

Rising temperatures along the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean will force American lobsters farther offshore and into more northern waters, a new study finds. Climate models project that ocean bottom temperatures in the Atlantic along the U.S. East Coast may rise by up to 4.3 degrees Celsius (7.7 degrees Fahrenehit) by the end of the century. The new study’s results show these rising temperatures will likely make conditions in the American lobster’s southernmost range—less hospitable in the future for juveniles, pushing them farther north and into habitats farther offshore.

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17 January 2018

Glacial moulin formation triggered by rapid lake drainage

Scientists are uncovering the mystery of how, where and when important glacial features called moulins form on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Moulins, vertical conduits that penetrate through the half-mile-deep ice, efficiently funnel the majority of summer meltwater from the ice surface to the base of the ice sheet.

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11 January 2018

Collaboration between scientists and stakeholders vital to climate readiness in Alaska

Alaskan residents rely on sustenance species like salmon, caribou, and moose, but their needs can be at odds with companies mining natural resources and conservationists. The state’s future will depend on collaboration between these various stakeholders, and scientists can help bridge the gap between these groups, according to researchers at Southern Oregon University.

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21 December 2017

Organic aerosols in remote areas have shorter lives than scientists assumed

Scientists find the lifetime of organic aerosols in the upper atmosphere is on the order of 10 days, far shorter than scientists previously assumed.

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15 December 2017

High-resolution climate models present alarming new projections for U.S.

Researchers have developed new, high-resolution climate models that may help policymakers mitigate the effects of climate change at a local level.

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Coastal erosion threatens archaeological sites along Greenland’s fjords

Hundreds of archaeology sites lie along the shores of Greenland’s fjords and coasts, revealing the entirety of the country’s ancestral cultures from as many as four thousand years ago. Coastal erosion, however, may soon drop many of those ancestral links into the ocean.

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