5 October 2016

Hverir, Mývatn, Iceland

Posted by Callan Bentley

Today, I offer up a few photos and some video from the Hverir geothermal area on the east side of Mývatn National Park in Iceland – a rift zone astride the central Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and thus an area where you would expect to see a high heat flow through the crust. Heat interacting with meteoric water produces geothermal features: hot springs, geysers, fumaroles, and mud pots (where the groundwater is acidic).

It’s a harsh looking landscape. No placid pile of basalt flows here:

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Craters galore dot the landscape, each home to a hissing vent of steam, or a pool of viscous mud:

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Old mud dries out, and cracks in the loveliest way:

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Thermophile microbes dwelling on the pile of rock:

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Video to show the dynamism of the place:

Shades of Yellowstone, for sure…