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You are browsing the archive for Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans Archives - GeoSpace.

20 September 2017

Tracking driftwood gives researchers insight into past Arctic Ocean changes

Wood from trees that fell into Arctic-draining rivers thousands of years ago is giving scientists a detailed look at how Arctic Ocean circulation has changed over the past 12,000 years. In a new study, researchers used nearly 1,000 pieces of driftwood collected from Arctic shorelines since the 1950s to track Arctic sea ice extent and ocean circulation since the start of the Holocene.

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8 August 2017

Tiny ocean waves could make large ice shelves crumble (plus VIDEO)

Small ocean waves could play a bigger role in breaking up ice shelves than tsunamis or other large waves, a new study suggests. A new study examining vibrations in Antarctica’s Ross Ice Shelf finds small waves continuously impacting the ice shelf may create enough strain to extend existing cracks in the ice and potentially create new ones. An ocean wave of 1 centimeter (0.5 inches) in height can cause vibrations that repeatedly move the ice more than 20 centimeters (8 inches).

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26 April 2017

New study challenges long-held tsunami formation theory (plus video)

A new study is challenging a long-held theory that tsunamis form and acquire their energy mostly from vertical movement of the seafloor. The finding validates an approach developed by researchers that uses GPS technology to detect a tsunami’s size and strength for early warnings.

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13 April 2017

Researchers unravel drivers of large iceberg movement

Researchers have succeeded in modeling how Antarctic icebergs drift through the Southern Ocean, and in identifying the physical factors behind their movement and their melting. Which factors are most important tends to depend on the size of the iceberg in question

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28 June 2016

Climate change causing oceanic boundary currents to intensify and shift poleward

Weather along the eastern coasts of South Africa, Asia, Australasia and South America will get significantly warmer and stormier on average over the next 100 years, a new study finds. The culprit? Climate changes that are causing ocean currents next to these coastal regions, called western boundary currents, to become stronger and extend further toward the poles, according to the new study.

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20 June 2016

Observing bubbles from underwater gas seeps (video)

Natural oil and gas seeps exist on the ocean floor all over the world. Although humans have known about and exploited these natural resources for thousands of years, scientists know little about how oil and gas droplets disperse in deep water and how they affect underwater ecosystems.

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