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10 December 2021

#AntarcticLog: Introducing I Was a Kid!

There’s something truly thrilling happening in the sciences — an effort to increase diversity and inclusion among the ranks. Across our research institutions I see a new emphasis on supporting all, and inspiring more to target science for their own careers. Because I write and draw so much for young people, that’s where I’ve put my energy for the last year and a half, and now I’m ready to share it. 

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23 November 2021

Sharing Science at AGU21

Well, it’s that time of year again. No, not the holidays (well, yes, that too). It’s AGU’s Fall Meeting!

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4 October 2021

Not-so-plain written: Can we infuse science writing with creative literacy?

Most information transmission among scientists comes in the form of written publications, and a science paper’s clout is too often granted through its tenacious use of a lexicon only understood by other experts in the field. Put this paper in front of a less-than-expert (me), and I’m left picking through sentences word by word trying my darndest to glean some sort of meaning out of it all. It’s not only exhausting, but frankly, it’s pretty boring.

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24 August 2021

#AntarcticLog: Science Education

Unlike many people in the sciences, I didn’t have much formal education myself. Much of what I’ve learned, I’ve learned on my feet, by wandering around behind scientists, watching and asking questions. All the more reason that the moment I first walked into the science classroom at my middle school looms large in my mind. 

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19 April 2021

#AntarcticLog: A whale of a time

What animal lives on the edge? If you’re like me, whales aren’t the first thing that comes to mind. And yet… this week’s #AntarcticLog examples tell the stories of whales with vastly different experiences when it comes to eating.

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8 March 2021

#VirtualFieldtrips: a supplementary educational tool in Covid-19 times

A virtual fieldwork can be useful in classes where students have the opportunity for a quick and realistic “visit” to a particular study area.

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2 March 2021

Social Science, Social Media, and Serendipity

What could possibly have motivated me to boldly attempt a social science research project in the middle of a geophysics PhD? Serendipity.

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4 January 2021

Show us your science sketches via #SketchYourScience

If you attended Fall Meeting this year or followed us on social media, you may have noticed some hand-drawn depictions of scientists’ research. We asked scientists at the meeting to draw their research through our #sketchyourscience campaign.

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3 January 2021

#AntarcticLog: Happy New Year!

Happy New Year! Let’s share a cup of something-or-other for days of time gone by — even if it’s champagne to express our joy at seeing the back of 2020. 

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21 December 2020

(Re)introducing the Sharing Science Virtual Learning Hub

For each webinar, we’ve created additional content to convey key points via multiple mediums. I’ve taken to TikTok and Reels to create scicomm videos with my dog. Our own Olivia Ambrogio has flexed her artistic drawing skills by creating <1-minute animations as well as animated webinar summaries. And our graphic design department has been putting together infographic summaries. 

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