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9 September 2020

Want to do outreach but don’t know where to start? We got you.

Science communication is a catch-all phrase that means so many things. Even when narrowing it down to scientists talking about their research to (mostly) non-scientists, there are still so many avenues and places to start.

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13 April 2020

Voice for Science: A Welcome with Advice from Alumni

In 2018, AGU launched Voices for Science, a program that centers around training scientists to address the critical need for communicating the value and impact of Earth and space science to key decision makers, journalists, and public audiences. The program recruits scientists to participate in one of two tracks: policy or communications.

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2 March 2020

Ocean Sciences 2020: SciComm, professional devo, non-academic advice, & more!

Last week was the Ocean Sciences (Oceans) meeting in San Diego, a joint a meeting between AGU, ASLO, and TOS. I personally love Oceans as it’s an opportunity to do my job while also having time to actually go to sessions.

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12 February 2020

The Geology Project: Bilingual Geoscience Communication by Bilingual Geoscientists

During the AGU Fall Meeting 2019, I presented a talk on The Geology Project (TGP). TGP is a social media-based geoscience communication enterprise with special focus on providing content in both Spanish and English. Based in Puerto Rico, TGP is run by five young Puerto Rican geoscientists, with one mission: communicating science to the world!

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10 February 2020

Widen Your Reach with Social Media

I recently read that in the United States alone, nearly 400,000 scientific papers are published each year. That’s a lot of competition for attention to your paper. How do you stand out in the crowd? Using social media can help.

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6 January 2020

Fall Meeting was amazing. What now?

Now that the holiday season is (largely) over, we’re reflecting here at Sharing Science on the successes of Fall Meeting and where we go from here.

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2 December 2019

SciComm, policy, and outreach at AGU19!

♩It’s the most, wonderful tiiiiiiiime, of the year! ♫ 

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11 November 2019

I had my doubts about Wikipedia…until an Edit-a-thon

I use Wikipedia. I feel like most folks on the internet have made their way to the website for one reason or another. It’s a treasure trove of information. Just the other day I found myself deep diving on 2018 earthquake that hit Alaska as it was the first (and only) one I’ve experienced. There was a lot of really science-y, technical language in the article. And I trusted it.

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27 September 2019

So, you wanna host a Twitter takeover (…of our account)?

Recently, a new word has entered my lexicon: rocur. I’ve actually had discussions with colleagues responsible for copy editing and marketing about using this word, mainly along the lines of, “that’s not a word.” This has made me realize I’ve migrated from one bubble of scientific research in conservation biology to another that’s focused on communication, policy, and social media.

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19 September 2019

Storytelling basics: The story arc

This post is the first in a mini-series on storytelling in the sciences. By Shane M Hanlon All good stories have an arc.* A beginning, middle, end. The action goes up and down. The tension leads to twists and turns. So, what does the basic story arc look like? Well:   This is an arc. Or, at this point, it’s a line. The beginning of the arc is the beginning …

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