Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Social media Archives - The Plainspoken Scientist.

6 January 2020

Fall Meeting was amazing. What now?

By Shane M Hanlon Now that the holiday season is (largely) over, we’re reflecting here at Sharing Science on the successes of Fall Meeting and where we go from here. So, Fall Meeting. While we’re still counting the numbers, we’re certain that more folks passed through our doors/events this year than ever before. So, thank you! And we’re learning what people want: Arts: Our How to Sketch Your Science workshop …

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


2 December 2019

SciComm, policy, and outreach at AGU19!

♩It’s the most, wonderful tiiiiiiiime, of the year! ♫ 

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


11 November 2019

I had my doubts about Wikipedia…until an Edit-a-thon

I use Wikipedia. I feel like most folks on the internet have made their way to the website for one reason or another. It’s a treasure trove of information. Just the other day I found myself deep diving on 2018 earthquake that hit Alaska as it was the first (and only) one I’ve experienced. There was a lot of really science-y, technical language in the article. And I trusted it.

Read More >>

2 Comments/Trackbacks >>


27 September 2019

So, you wanna host a Twitter takeover (…of our account)?

Recently, a new word has entered my lexicon: rocur. I’ve actually had discussions with colleagues responsible for copy editing and marketing about using this word, mainly along the lines of, “that’s not a word.” This has made me realize I’ve migrated from one bubble of scientific research in conservation biology to another that’s focused on communication, policy, and social media.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


19 September 2019

Storytelling basics: The story arc

By Shane M Hanlon  All good stories have an arc.* A beginning, middle, end. The action goes up and down. The tension leads to twists and turns. So, what does the basic story arc look like? Well:   This is an arc. Or, at this point, it’s a line. The beginning of the arc is the beginning of the story. Set the scene: where are we? Who are the characters? …

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


30 August 2019

Storytelling basics: A (mini) series

I’m a professional storyteller. It’s a weird thing to say and has been a weirder realization to come to. But, it’s true.

Read More >>

1 Comment/Trackback >>


14 August 2019

Wakelet – the new (& in my opinion better) Storify

I spend a lot of time on social media, specifically Twitter. It’s my job. Our @AGU_SciComm account is one of the primary ways to disseminate Sharing Science information, AGU happenings, new science in the field of scicomm, popular science pieces around policy and communication, and more. Twitter is also where I turn to for hashtag campaigns, especially those centered around AGU.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


25 March 2019

Moon Madness 2019

Announcing the 2019 Milky Way Division I Moon Championships hosted by @theAGU.
Tuesday, March 26 – Monday, April 8.

16 competitors, 15 matches, one moon champion.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


11 March 2019

Is Chasing Ice an effective message on climate change?

In 2005 and 2006, photographer James Balog set out on expeditions to document the recession of the Sólheimajökull Glacier in Iceland. In many ways, these expeditions changed his life. In 2007, Balog and companions founded the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS), an organization devoted to documenting the effects of climate change on glaciers through time-lapse photography. Over 10 years later, the EIS “…provides scientists with basic and vitally important information on the mechanics of glacial melting and educates the public with firsthand evidence of how rapidly the Earth’s climate is changing.”

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


4 March 2019

So, you wanna start a science blog?

I’m not the type of person who’s always thought that I’ve had something to say (at least anything that people would listen to). Back in my grad school days, while I saw the value in science outreach, the “communication” part of that was a little tricky for me. “Who cares what I have to say?” Turns out, some people did.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>