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6 July 2020

Viruses as Medicine for Antibiotic-Resistant Bacterial Infections

One of the most groundbreaking medical discoveries has been the development of phage therapy. Phage therapy refers to the use of bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, as a mechanism to defeat antibiotic resistant infections. Phage therapy was first researched due to the fact that, globally, 1.5 million people die from tuberculosis each year. 

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2 July 2020

Rabies: What Do You Really Know?

When people think of rabies, they are most likely visualizing an aggressive animal foaming at the mouth and ready to viciously attack any living thing in sight, but is this image always the case?

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17 June 2020

An early career perspective on bridging the science policy divide

As more scientists with PhDs are interested in applied research and pursue non-traditional (i.e., non-tenure track) career pathways, there is growing interest in working at the science-policy interface. Scientific expertise is often valuable for informing and guiding legislative actions and policy decisions.

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13 April 2020

Voice for Science: A Welcome with Advice from Alumni

In 2018, AGU launched Voices for Science, a program that centers around training scientists to address the critical need for communicating the value and impact of Earth and space science to key decision makers, journalists, and public audiences. The program recruits scientists to participate in one of two tracks: policy or communications.

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2 March 2020

Dinosaurs Under the Tundra, Part 2: Talking about Climate Change with a Climate Skeptic

As a recap; home for Christmas holidays, having a nice conversation with my in-laws. My father-in-law’s wife voices skepticism about climate change. Part 1 of this blog talked about what I could learn from that skepticism, and how listening might guide future climate research.  Part 2, this part, is about how I could’ve shared some of the things I’ve learned about climate science.

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24 February 2020

Dinosaurs Under the Tundra, Part 1: Talking about Climate Change with a Climate Skeptic

I was at home over Christmas when my father-in-law’s wife started talking about the dinosaurs that used to be in Alaska. At first, I thought she was just sharing a cool geologic fact, but it turned out she was making a point about natural climate cycles.  She went on to say that she loved her little Honda and she just wanted to be able to drive it.

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2 December 2019

SciComm, policy, and outreach at AGU19!

♩It’s the most, wonderful tiiiiiiiime, of the year! ♫ 

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20 November 2019

Having “The [Climate Change] Talk” with your family

Thanksgiving can be a time for food, football, and family. And sometimes…uncomfortable family chats, especially around science. We live in a nation where there are disconnects between understanding and acceptance of major scientific issues such as GMOs, evolution, vaccinations, and (especially relevant to AGU scientists) climate change.

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5 July 2019

Lyme Disease in Winter

Similar to other wildlife diseases, there are myths about Lyme disease. While many myths exists, one of the most interesting myths about Lyme disease pertains to transmission. People believe that ticks cannot survive in the winter; so, Lyme disease cannot be transmitted during winter.

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27 May 2019

Revealing the baseline of geoscience outreach

Geoscience has been one of the least diverse STEM fields for nearly four decades, perhaps in part because our science isn’t making it to those who are outside our departments and institutions. In the era of climate change skepticism, geoscientists who practice science communication could provide immense value to their local and global communities by serving as Earth experts who can empower non-scientists to engage in reasoning and analysis in all aspects of life.

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