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You are browsing the archive for science policy Archives - The Plainspoken Scientist.

3 May 2021

SciComm as Dialogue—not Monologue—in Appalachian Kentucky

Want to reach out to nontraditional geoscience stakeholders? Have you wondered how to engage them or who they might be in the first place? A pilot project in a five-county area of eastern Kentucky is showing us at the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) how we can go beyond traditional science communication strategies to reach new stakeholders and help them solve problems in their communities.

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1 February 2021

Supporting scientists who communicate: Roles for universities and scientific societies

Many scientists feel that science communication must be done in their “free time.” It becomes a hobby or a side gig, in tension with the expectations that most departments and universities have for scientists to devote the vast majority of their time and energy to research. The current academic “system” — the policies that determine hiring, promotion, and tenure decisions, the allocation of resources, and the training available to scientists — does not sufficiently incentivize or value science communication.

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25 January 2021

Translating science for policymaking

During my postdoc, I started exploring other career options different from academia. Through this exploration, I ended up building a career seminar series and organizing a symposium, and these experiences peaked my interest in training. I wanted to pursue a career path that would focus on creating educational programs and opportunities for early career researchers, but could never get a job in that space

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22 January 2021

#AntarcticLog: The Future of Science & Action

Thanks to voices like these, my ears are tuned — and my heart is ready — for serious and swift progress on saving the earth for future generations. May our leaders be strong and brave. 

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11 January 2021

Science communication, policy, and outreach jobs/fellowships 2021

As someone who transitioned out of academia (mostly), I get asked this question a lot: Where should I look for scicomm/policy jobs and fellowships? Well, I have some suggestions.

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21 December 2020

(Re)introducing the Sharing Science Virtual Learning Hub

For each webinar, we’ve created additional content to convey key points via multiple mediums. I’ve taken to TikTok and Reels to create scicomm videos with my dog. Our own Olivia Ambrogio has flexed her artistic drawing skills by creating <1-minute animations as well as animated webinar summaries. And our graphic design department has been putting together infographic summaries. 

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14 December 2020

#AGU20 Sharing Science Week 2 Recap

While last week went really well, this week we found out stride and, with some experience under our belts, had some fun with it.

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1 December 2020

Introducing #AntarcticLog

In 2017, I learned that after several years of applying, I’d finally made the cut: the National Science Foundation was funding me to travel to Palmer Station, Antarctica, under the Antarctic Artists and Writers program, as a member of a team of researchers from the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences.  My plan: to create a visual journal that would show our experiences in writing and drawings.  The intention: to share the journal online for the two-month duration of our trip.

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11 August 2020

Advocating for climate science

A growing number of scientists in the United States are politically active and engaged, especially around issues affecting science. And researchers have the right to participate in advocacy, even if they work for federal agencies or state-funded institutions. Despite this, we at the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund frequently speak with scientists deterred from advocacy after hearing of well-meaning colleagues who’ve been accused, for example, of violating anti-lobbying laws for writing an op-ed.

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3 August 2020

My name is Jacqui, and I am a science communicator.

My name is Jacqui, and I am a science communicator. There. I admit it.

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