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1 December 2020

Introducing #AntarcticLog

In 2017, I learned that after several years of applying, I’d finally made the cut: the National Science Foundation was funding me to travel to Palmer Station, Antarctica, under the Antarctic Artists and Writers program, as a member of a team of researchers from the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences.  My plan: to create a visual journal that would show our experiences in writing and drawings.  The intention: to share the journal online for the two-month duration of our trip.

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11 August 2020

Advocating for climate science

A growing number of scientists in the United States are politically active and engaged, especially around issues affecting science. And researchers have the right to participate in advocacy, even if they work for federal agencies or state-funded institutions. Despite this, we at the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund frequently speak with scientists deterred from advocacy after hearing of well-meaning colleagues who’ve been accused, for example, of violating anti-lobbying laws for writing an op-ed.

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3 August 2020

My name is Jacqui, and I am a science communicator.

My name is Jacqui, and I am a science communicator. There. I admit it.

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10 July 2020

Debunking the alleged connection between Lyme disease and Unrelated Conditions

Lyme Disease, or Lyme Borreliosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the Borrelia genus of Bacteria. This bacteria is usually transferred to a human host by the bite of a tick. Lyme disease can effect the host’s neurology and often results in fever, headache, tiredness, various bodily pains, and in some cases memory loss. Lyme disease has proven to be a major problem in the United States, affecting an estimated 300,000 Americans yearly. 

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9 July 2020

Danse Macabre, Not as Fun as it Sounds

Wildlife diseases not only impact the health of humans and animals, but they also play a large role in generating artistic trends. One such trend in, or genre of, art was the Danse Macabre, also known as the Dance of Death. This French term comes from the artistic genre that was seen in 1250 to 1500 CE Europe, during the Late Middle Ages. It symbolizes the fact that the journey of life and death is expired by all, and is a uniting theme despite its morbid tone.  

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6 July 2020

Viruses as Medicine for Antibiotic-Resistant Bacterial Infections

One of the most groundbreaking medical discoveries has been the development of phage therapy. Phage therapy refers to the use of bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, as a mechanism to defeat antibiotic resistant infections. Phage therapy was first researched due to the fact that, globally, 1.5 million people die from tuberculosis each year. 

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2 July 2020

Rabies: What Do You Really Know?

When people think of rabies, they are most likely visualizing an aggressive animal foaming at the mouth and ready to viciously attack any living thing in sight, but is this image always the case?

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17 June 2020

An early career perspective on bridging the science policy divide

As more scientists with PhDs are interested in applied research and pursue non-traditional (i.e., non-tenure track) career pathways, there is growing interest in working at the science-policy interface. Scientific expertise is often valuable for informing and guiding legislative actions and policy decisions.

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13 April 2020

Voice for Science: A Welcome with Advice from Alumni

In 2018, AGU launched Voices for Science, a program that centers around training scientists to address the critical need for communicating the value and impact of Earth and space science to key decision makers, journalists, and public audiences. The program recruits scientists to participate in one of two tracks: policy or communications.

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2 March 2020

Dinosaurs Under the Tundra, Part 2: Talking about Climate Change with a Climate Skeptic

As a recap; home for Christmas holidays, having a nice conversation with my in-laws. My father-in-law’s wife voices skepticism about climate change. Part 1 of this blog talked about what I could learn from that skepticism, and how listening might guide future climate research.  Part 2, this part, is about how I could’ve shared some of the things I’ve learned about climate science.

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