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You are browsing the archive for Online outreach Archives - The Plainspoken Scientist.

11 March 2019

Is Chasing Ice an effective message on climate change?

In 2005 and 2006, photographer James Balog set out on expeditions to document the recession of the Sólheimajökull Glacier in Iceland. In many ways, these expeditions changed his life. In 2007, Balog and companions founded the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS), an organization devoted to documenting the effects of climate change on glaciers through time-lapse photography. Over 10 years later, the EIS “…provides scientists with basic and vitally important information on the mechanics of glacial melting and educates the public with firsthand evidence of how rapidly the Earth’s climate is changing.”

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4 March 2019

So, you wanna start a science blog?

By Shane M Hanlon I’m not the type of person who’s always thought that I’ve had something to say (at least anything that people would listen to). Back in my grad school days, while I saw the value in science outreach, the “communication” part of that was a little tricky for me. “Who cares what I have to say?” Turns out, some people did. Back in…2013 (2012, maybe?) realized that …

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14 February 2019

Happy Science Valentine’s Day!

In which we offer you a series of valentines to scientific fields of study.

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4 February 2019

Conveying Science through Art: An Alternative Way of Communicating about Earth Observation research

In the Americas, We Use Satellites to Sow Dreams in the Soil is a three-part poem that was presented at the 2018 fall session of American Geophysical Union (AGU). The poem was an alternative – perhaps unconventional – way of presenting about three Earth Observation (EO) initiatives that I and colleagues at NASA’s SERVIR Science Coordination Office and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are involved with.

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3 December 2018

Tell a story, sing a song, & learn some stuff at AGU18!

AGU18 is…next week! Wow, that happened fast. We have a full slate of amazing science communication, policy, and outreach events planned for the entire week of the meeting!

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16 November 2018

Register for scicomm workshops, Open Mic Night, & more at AGU18

AGU18 is…oh wow…less than a month away! We in the Sharing Science program are busily putting the final touches on all the content, logistics, swag, and more to make this the more Sharing Science-y meeting yet!

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23 October 2018

Imagine how hot the future will be by looking to your past

How do you frame the messaging behind changes in future climate? Remind people of the hottest days they’ve ever experienced.

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22 October 2018

Are you spending enough time on social media?

By @oceanseaicenpi “Science isn’t finished until it’s communicated”. This famous quote, along with “publish or perish”, highlights perfectly the importance of communication for a scientist. We are all accustomed to publishing our results to our peers through peer-review articles. But, reaching the general public is also in our mandate. In recent years, the increasing use of social media has been accompanied with an increase of both in demand from the …

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12 October 2018

Sharing stories of consensus building: the missing step in the scientific method

By Kathy Kelsey As a kid in school, I learned the narrative of the scientific method: a scientist makes an observation about the world which inspires a question, they pose a hypothesis, carry out an experiment, and produce and share their results.  Now that I am a practicing scientist I have learned that this narrative neglects a key component: the process of building consensus among scientists.  It’s important that we …

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11 September 2018

Share your field pictures w/ us (on Tumblr)!

As some of you might be aware, we have a (freaking awesome) Instagram account that features many of our scientists showing us their field sites, labs, outreach activities, etc. (if you’re not aware, you should really check it out). In addition to Instagram, we like to feature scientists in the field via our Postcards from the Field campaign through our  Tumblr account. where scientists share stories and photos from their field experiences.

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