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23 November 2021

Sharing Science at AGU21

Well, it’s that time of year again. No, not the holidays (well, yes, that too). It’s AGU’s Fall Meeting!

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19 November 2021

#AntarcticLog: Fruitcakes in Antarctica

At times I have the excellent opportunity to go into the field with scientists and report out through the lens of #AntarcticLog comics.  Here’s a sampling, ready for the holidays. Perhaps, like me, you are thankful for fruitcake?  This one time when I went to Antarctica aboard the drill ship JOIDES Resolution, my children’s author/poet/photographer/baker friend Leslie Bulion sent me with a fruitcake.

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17 November 2021

#DrawnToGeoscience: Storytelling via Zine

I have been interested in science communication, art, and literature since the start of my education in the environmental sciences. There are as many ways of communicating science as there are scientists: graphs, figures, presentations, papers, books, lectures. By channeling information about dissolved organic matter biogeochemistry into a comic book—a recognizable form, with its own connotations—I wanted to spark contemplation of what it means to produce and communicate scientific knowledge.

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10 November 2021

#DrawnToGeoscience: Embroidering volcanos

The journey of my volcano wearable-art began with the inspiration provided by #QuiltYourScience. The idea of sharing my research and passion for all things volcanic through the medium of fabric and thread swirled in my brain for months. While I still look forward to creating a volcanically themed quilt one day, I wanted to capture the voluminous and turbulent eruptive plumes rising above the edifice and the complexity of volcanic plumbing systems forming nested magma webs below the surface of the volcano.

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5 November 2021

#AntarcticLog: Happy Halloween!

I’ll make no bones about it: I love Halloween.  There’s something freeing about masks (even in pandemic times), costumes (this year my costume is a raccoon), and decorations involving our deepest, darkest fears and nightmarish stories. 

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29 October 2021

#AntarcticLog: Charting a path forward by looking back

When it comes to climate change and the outcomes we face, time is short, and the world needs action. How do we know? Yes, through assessments of temperature and greenhouse gas emissions. But also through processes that open windows on the distant past — deep time. Ice cores carry us backward on a timeline so long it’s best expressed as a spiral. 

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22 October 2021

#AntarcticLog: Amal, Shackleton, & Nansen

Last week I posted my 200th #AntarcticLog science comic, about the 200 million people that the World Bank estimates will have to move because of the effects of climate change. That present concern is well represented by the journey of Little Amal, a giant puppet of a Syrian refugee girl who is currently on a march of her own. 

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15 October 2021

#AntarcticLog: 200 million displaced by climate change

It’s a week to celebrate for me: #AntarcticLog #200 just posted.  Here it is. To acknowledge the moment, I looked for a topic that would reflect that number: 200. And what I came up with was sobering: the World Bank’s assessment of the number of humans due to be displaced by climate change. (And that’s just the humans.) 

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4 October 2021

Not-so-plain written: Can we infuse science writing with creative literacy?

Most information transmission among scientists comes in the form of written publications, and a science paper’s clout is too often granted through its tenacious use of a lexicon only understood by other experts in the field. Put this paper in front of a less-than-expert (me), and I’m left picking through sentences word by word trying my darndest to glean some sort of meaning out of it all. It’s not only exhausting, but frankly, it’s pretty boring.

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1 October 2021

#AntarcticLog: Visualizing climate change

At the Bigelow Laboratory in East Boothbay, Maine, the walls are made of glass. It facilitates communication, not just because it’s transparent, but because it gives the scientists something to draw on. Did you realize that scientists are dedicated doodlers? They embrace visual imagery to convey their processes and their findings. Case in point: Stephanie Peart’s demonstration of cloud formation, in this #AntarcticLog comic: 

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