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You are browsing the archive for Climate science communication Archives - The Plainspoken Scientist.

19 November 2018

Having “The [Climate Change] Talk” with your family

By Shane M Hanlon Thanksgiving can be a time for food, football, and family. And sometimes…uncomfortable family chats, especially around science. We live in a nation where there are disconnects between understanding and acceptance of major scientific issues such as GMOs, evolution, vaccinations, and (especially relevant to AGU scientists*) climate change. With climate change specifically, politics plays a role. Over half of Americans accept human-induced climate change, as well as …

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12 September 2018

Talking health might shift attitudes on global warming

By Shane M Hanlon Global warming is a political issue. It shouldn’t be, but it is. I recently wrote a post about it that outlined political views on the subject, probably best summarized by this1: Takeaway: majority of folks think that global warming is happening but views vary widely based on political affiliation. You might ask, “Yeah, but there are a bunch of different people in political parties. What about …

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2 August 2018

American (voter) attitudes on climate change are complex

Americans have strong feelings about climate change. In addition to political affiliation, it turns out that how old you are can influence the degree to which you accept human-influenced clinate change

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14 May 2018

The humans behind climate science – a podcast

“I’m too busy,” I said to myself. “I should be writing papers,” I protested. Nevertheless, the idea wouldn’t go away. It refused to die.

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12 February 2018

Third Pod from the Sun is back!

Our podcast is back and this time we’re talking about performing science at the edge of glaciers!

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5 February 2018

Science doesn’t speak for itself. The IPCC agrees.

By Shane M Hanlon Our job in Sharing Science is to help scientists communicate more effectively. Turns out that we’re not the only ones who understand the value of this endeavor. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recognizes that “…climate change doesn’t communicate itself.” So, they’ve released a pretty great guide. Of note, they touch on six main principles: Be a confident communicator Talk about the real world, not abstract …

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29 January 2018

A Change of Climate: Part 1

By Sam Illingworth Climate change is real. It is happening now. It affects all of us. And the only way that we can mitigate its effects in a meaningful fashion is to take collective action. Part of the challenge that we face in mobilising this collective action is in convincing people from currently less affected areas that climate change is right now, this second, responsible for the destruction of thousands …

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16 January 2017

The need for action through scicomm

By Shane M Hanlon “What do you do?” This is a question that I’m asked almost daily as a DC resident where interest in one’s profession is only surpassed by interest in politics. But back in 2010, when I was a 2nd-year PhD student, I was not used to this question. I had successfully avoided (i.e. didn’t try) making friends outside of my program during my first year, so when I …

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30 December 2016

Sharing science with the public via the NCAR Explorer Series

In the Boulder, CO area? Stop by NCAR for their public lecture Explorer Series!

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29 August 2016

#SciWords: 1 word, multiple meanings

By Shane M Hanlon Jargon—it’s everywhere, from your favorite sport to politics to your profession. This fact is especially true in the sciences where scientific jargon is often seen as a barrier to effectively communicating with non-science audiences. We in the Sharing Science program usually spend an entire section of our science communication workshops with tips to avoid jargon (here are a few). There are all kinds of resources out there …

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