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You are browsing the archive for Climate science communication Archives - The Plainspoken Scientist.

9 April 2021

#AntArcticLog: Narwhals, narwhals, swimming in the ocean (& other whales)…

One thing I never got to do a comic about during the time at Palmer Station were the whales. Whales spouting at a distance…breaching nearby…diving, fluking, flapping…and, in the gray gloom of an early winter morning, taking an audible inhale before disappearing under the surface, ahead of a background of icebergs.  I extended my comic coverage of whales to the Arctic, as well, for the Polar Whale series. 

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19 March 2021

#AntarcticLog: What’s the Ecostat?

As promised, I’m back with more of that invisible science.  That’s what the Antarctic Artists and Writers program of the National Science Foundation sent me to Palmer Station to do: take a close look at invisible phytoplankton and create pictures to tell their story. 

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12 March 2021

#AntarcticLog: Antarctic Service Medal

Last week I received a special package in the mail: my Antarctic Service Medal, made for my contribution to U.S. efforts to understand the continent — and the planet. 

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#RhymeYourResearch: Carbon, You’re Key

Recently, I have been homeschooling one of my children. We got onto a geology kick while digging up various rocks on our walks in the woods. To better understand what we were finding, I read through a rocks and minerals handbook.

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26 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Canaries in the Coal Mine

When it come to climate change and its impact on the animal world, there’s more than one “canary in the coal mine.” To mix a few potent metaphors, the dominoes are falling — and, if it’s true that God is in the details, it’s fair to say that individual animals help tell the story.  As I work to make climate change science accessible and comprehensible through #AntarcticLog, I’ve found myself leaning on keystone species.  The assortment featured here tell separate stories about the effects of global warming, and they add up to a clear picture of what’s happening. 

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12 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Antarctic Classics 

Who’s reading #AntarcticLog comics?  Lots of different people actually. At first I thought it was just my friends and family, but as I began to cover the work of particular scientists, it caught the attention of the science community, as well.  Science communicators paid attention, and — sure enough — Antarctica worked its magic on the general population, especially teachers and their students.    

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28 January 2021

#AntarcticLog: Adequate Earth

#AntarcticLog was my primary project under the National Science Foundation’s Antarctic Artists and Writers Program.  This week, a group of artists and writers from this program are doing something big, and I wanted to tell you about it.  

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22 January 2021

#AntarcticLog: The Future of Science & Action

Thanks to voices like these, my ears are tuned — and my heart is ready — for serious and swift progress on saving the earth for future generations. May our leaders be strong and brave. 

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20 November 2020

#AGURocks: The Enchantment of Small Things

Emotion for Change (EfC) was born from an idea of mine, (I’m an established classic musician and an active artist for environmental sustainability and social equality) and brings together a group of musicians, artists and scientists who share the desire to communicate their enchantment and love for the “symphonic” beauty of nature. 

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15 May 2020

#AGURocks: Geologise Theatre – All the world’s a stage!

I am a PhD student in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Oxford (UK) and one half of the musical science communication duo Geologise Theatre. We (Matthew Kemp, a fellow PhD student, and myself) write and perform songs and theatre pieces about the science of the Earth, from fossils to climate change! Shakespeare famously wrote “All the world’s a stage”, and we’ve taken that (perhaps too) literally…

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