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2 March 2020

Dinosaurs Under the Tundra, Part 2: Talking about Climate Change with a Climate Skeptic

As a recap; home for Christmas holidays, having a nice conversation with my in-laws. My father-in-law’s wife voices skepticism about climate change. Part 1 of this blog talked about what I could learn from that skepticism, and how listening might guide future climate research.  Part 2, this part, is about how I could’ve shared some of the things I’ve learned about climate science.

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24 February 2020

Dinosaurs Under the Tundra, Part 1: Talking about Climate Change with a Climate Skeptic

I was at home over Christmas when my father-in-law’s wife started talking about the dinosaurs that used to be in Alaska. At first, I thought she was just sharing a cool geologic fact, but it turned out she was making a point about natural climate cycles.  She went on to say that she loved her little Honda and she just wanted to be able to drive it.

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13 January 2020

K-12 Teachers: Earth & Environmental Science need YOU

We all share the burden of climate change. However, an unequal representation among earth and environmental scientists means little cross-cultural appeal to young scientists to discover and apply solutions to climate change. Because our career choices can be strongly influenced and inspired by a good teacher, my colleagues and I work to improve earth science teaching at the K-12 level.

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17 December 2019

New climate change survey highlights disconnect b/t knowledge and action

Last month [the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication] released the most recent version of their Climate Change in the American Mind report, they find some truly interesting stuff. I summarized it via Twitter and have pasted my hot-takes below.

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20 November 2019

Having “The [Climate Change] Talk” with your family

Thanksgiving can be a time for food, football, and family. And sometimes…uncomfortable family chats, especially around science. We live in a nation where there are disconnects between understanding and acceptance of major scientific issues such as GMOs, evolution, vaccinations, and (especially relevant to AGU scientists) climate change.

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3 July 2019

Climate Change is Now Harming… Our Dogs?

As if climate change did not seem to be negatively impacting everything as we know it already, it also has recently been shown to trigger the spread of diseases throughout the United States.

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18 March 2019

Communicating climate change through traditional folk theater

Working as a scientist turned communicator is, I believe, one of the toughest jobs. Working with the non-experts specially without any scientific background knowledge is not easy at all. And specially when those non-experts are just making ends meet.

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11 March 2019

Is Chasing Ice an effective message on climate change?

In 2005 and 2006, photographer James Balog set out on expeditions to document the recession of the Sólheimajökull Glacier in Iceland. In many ways, these expeditions changed his life. In 2007, Balog and companions founded the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS), an organization devoted to documenting the effects of climate change on glaciers through time-lapse photography. Over 10 years later, the EIS “…provides scientists with basic and vitally important information on the mechanics of glacial melting and educates the public with firsthand evidence of how rapidly the Earth’s climate is changing.”

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What does climate sound and look like?

We’ve developed a new exhibit, called Sounding Climate, that uses sound and images to represent modeled temperature, precipitation, sea ice and carbon dioxide data. The exhibit, installed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, helps public visitors explore data on an interactive touchscreen to understand anthropogenic climate change and natural variability.

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28 January 2019

The World We’ll leave Our Grandchildren: Theatre as a means of stimulating the public discussion of climate change

When communicating with an audience it is important to have clear answers to the questions (i) Who are they?, (ii) What do I want them to do?, and (iii) How can they do it? It was with this in mind that in 2014 I embarked on a project to write and perform a play on climate change.

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