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8 March 2017

Q&A, episode 4

Who are “the 3%?” A reader question prompts a conversation with “Skeptical Science” guru and cognitive scientist John Cook.

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5 October 2015

Trace fossils in the Juniata and Tuscarora Formations

Route 33 in Pendleton County, West Virginia cuts across the lower Paleozoic stratigraphic section. I went there this past spring on a sedimentology and stratigraphy field trip with the GMU sed/strat class. The trip was orchestrated by professor Rick Diecchio. Here are some scenes from two of the stops – the upper Ordovician Juniata formation (red sandstones and shale intepreted as Taconian molasse) and the overlying Silurian Tuscarora Formation (thick …

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20 August 2015

Stromatoporoids in a Devonian reef

Here are a few shots of a Devonian aged reef exposed in Mustoe, Virginia – one of the sites I visited this spring with GMU’s Rick Diecchio, when he led his sedimentology and stratigraphy trip there. At first, the outcrop made no sense to me – I kept searching for bedding, and failed to find it. Then, the reef interpretation clicked, and suddenly I didn’t “need” bedding any more… Stromatoporoids …

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5 August 2015

Ripple marks and trace fossils in the Rose Hill Formation

An outcrop of Silurian-aged Rose Hill Formation in West Virginia reveals excellent examples of ripple marks and trace fossils.

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16 April 2015

Eocene dike and sill in Ordovician limestone

A virtual field trip to a quarry in far western Virginia, showing anomalous igneous intrusions (a dike and a sill) of Eocene age cross-cutting early Paleozoic carbonates.

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15 April 2015

Spring time

This past weekend, I had a chance to visit Bath, Highland, and Alleghany Counties, Virginia, three amazingly beautiful places I had never before seen. I was tagging along on my colleague Rick Diecchio’s annual sedimentology & stratigraphy field trip for George Mason University. I was eager to learn from some awesome field sites from him in the year before he retires. We saw some terrific sedimentary rocks, of which more …

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6 August 2014

Guest post: Glaciolacustrine deltas in the Canadian Rockies

One of Callan’s “Canadian Rockies” field course students supplies a guest post about deltas that build out into glacial lakes.

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15 March 2013

Friday fold: a recumbent anticline in an abandoned quarry

Yesterday, I spent a pleasant day in the field with John Singleton, the new structural geology professor at George Mason University. I was showing John a couple of sites I’ve used as field trip locations for the GMU structural geology class, and John was showing a couple of new sites to me – places he visited on last fall’s Virginia Geological Field Conference. I missed VGFC last fall, as I …

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Giant pencil cleavage in the Martinsburg Formation

Two giant “pencils” in the Martinsburg Formation: You can see smaller (more typically sized) “pencils” on the slope behind me. Photo by John Singleton, GMU.

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23 April 2012

GMU structural geology students admire Compton Peak columns

Last Saturday, before the rains moved in…

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