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17 May 2019

Friday fold: Found folds

This week, for Friday folds, I offer up some random folds that have passed my perceptual transom this week. First up: In the new Netflix series Our Planet, in episode 7 (Fresh Water), an anticline/syncline pair makes a brief appearance as David Attenborough discusses glaciers as a reservoir for fresh water. Here is a screenshot: I’m not sure where this is in the world: Greenland? Antarctica? Let me know in …

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29 January 2019

The Parallel Roads of Glen Roy

What can we learn from Scotland’s Parallel Roads of Glen Roy?

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20 July 2018

Friday fold: Alpine peak containing a high elevation recumbent fold

Via Twitter, a Friday fold from Maddy Rushing: #FridayFold, @callanbentley? pic.twitter.com/eaKIuuvFgB — Maddy Rushing (@komaddyite) May 25, 2018 This is in the Alps of Switzerland; I don’t know more about it than that. If you recognize the site or the geology, educate us in the comments!

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23 June 2018

Deformed conglomerate of Frog Lakes, California

Fifteen years after mapping deformed rocks of the Sierra Crest shear zone system in the high Sierra, a family vacation brings Callan back to the pre-batholith metasedimentary rocks which show a pronounced strain.

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16 March 2018

Friday fold: a boulder from Spitsbergen

Today’s Friday fold comes to your eyeballs courtesy of my colleague Shelley Jaye, who took it in 1982: She found this in a glacial moraine adjacent to Lovlibreen Glacier, on the north shore of St. Jonsfjorden, Spitsbergen, Svalbard. Very cool disharmonic folding. Thanks for sharing, Shelley! Happy Friday to all.

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8 February 2018

A spectacular display of Earth science in the Alabama Hills

A detailed examination of an elegant photo of the eastern front of California’s Sierra Nevada, from the perspective of the Alabama Hills. How many different geologic phenomena can be packed into a single image? Let’s find out!

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7 February 2017

Basaltic strata, faulting, and glaciation in western Iceland

Today, let’s journey to Iceland, to a bit northwest of Reykjavík. This is a view from the top of the Grábrók cinder cone, across the valley to the east. With very few exceptions, Iceland is a big pile of basalt, and that shows through in the walls of this valley, which display a stack of basaltic lava flows, intercalated in places with pyroclastic debris or volcaniclastic sediment. One portion of …

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24 November 2016

U-turn

Scotland was glaciated during the Pleistocene “Ice Ages:” The signatures of glaciation are manifold in a scene like this. Most prominent and easily recognizable is the broad, relatively flat-bottomed U-shaped valley. Now check this one out: That’s a U-turn in a U-shaped valley: the valley is first gouged to the right, then turning around and heading in almost the reverse direction: Good things these things flow so slow, otherwise that …

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4 September 2015

Friday fold: Prins Christian Sund, Greenland

This Friday, we are off looking for folds in South Greenland. Care to join?

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12 August 2015

Student guest post: the Belt Supergroup in Glacier National Park

As longtime readers know, late summer is when my Rockies students submit their final projects – web-based explanations of key geologic sites they examined during the trip. Today, I offer you a guest blog post by student John Leaming. You’ll notice that I’m not *completely* absent from the post, however – I make a couple of cameos as “sense of scale.” Enjoy, -CB ______________________________________________________________ Glacier National Park, Belt Supergroup I …

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