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25 March 2011

Friday fold: conference samples

At last weekend’s northeastern / north-central GSA meeting in Pittsburgh, David Saja of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History presented a talk entitled, “Geometric Analysis of Folded Greywacke Layers from Pacheco Pass, California.” [Abstract link] In addition to the standard PowerPoint presentation that 99% of GSA speakers use, David also brought in some hand-samples (what we in the business like to call pocket folds) to display. As his title implies, …

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18 March 2011

Friday fold: OSF migmatite

Migmatite schist sample from Orange Springs Farm, near Unionville, Virginia, with cm-demarcated pencil for scale. Sample was cut and polished. Here’s what the untreated sample looks like: Happy Friday. Enjoy your weekend. I’m off to the Northeastern / North-Central joint section meeting of the Geological Society of America today. We’ll see if my time in Pittsburgh gives me enough time to blog or not…

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20 December 2010

GoSF2: Basalt

Second in the on-going series about the geology of San Francisco: this post explores the pillow basalts of the Marin Headlands Terrane.

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19 December 2010

GoSF1: Introduction and overview

The first in a multi-part series on the geology of San Francisco and the surrounding area.

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18 December 2010

AGU, day 4

My final day at AGU was Thursday, and I spent a lot of it working on school stuff, but I did zip down to the Moscone Center for a session on communicating science to the public in an age of increased public scrutiny. Michael Mann of Penn State was the big draw here, discussing his experiences being subject to the “Climategate” email flap, Freedom of Information Act requests from James …

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16 December 2010

AGU, day 3

I took a break yesterday morning from nonstop AGU meeting stuff, and got out into the city a bit. A former student of mine, Alan P., lives in San Francisco these days, and works at a local bike shop. So Alan scored us a couple of bicycles and we went for a ride from North Beach past the south tower of the Golden Gate Bridge to several beaches exposed between …

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14 December 2010

AGU, Day 2

Man, this meeting is intense. There’s so much going on all the time that for every session or talk you commit to, you’re missing literally dozens of others. This is kind of like going to the library and picking out a book, knowing that there are many other books you’re not reading — but with the exception that every 20 minutes, the old choices are gone, and they’re replaced with …

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AGU; Days -1, 0, and 1

San Francisco is great. I got out here Friday night and spent a lovely day Saturday hiking over the Golden Gate Bridge and through the Marin Headlands with my fiancee. That evening, for my 36th birthday, we went out to the Tadich Grill, source of the best cioppino (Italian seafood soup) in the city. Sunday, I enjoyed a geology field trip with other two-year-college geoscience faculty courtesy of Katryn Wiese …

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6 December 2010

Gerede segment of the North Anatolian Fault

The author recounts a field trip in October along the section of Turkey’s North Anatolian Fault that last ruptured in 1944. The rock types on either side of the fault are compared, offset markers are illustrated, and several types of landforms particular to strike-slip faults are shown. The post concludes with an examination of the town of Gerede itself, which is built directly atop the fault.

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11 November 2010

Microfaults-a-million

I got to Pittsburgh around 1:30pm yesterday, which meant I had several free hours before the opening reception for new Fine Fellows. I took a bunch of photos of the exhibits there, but my traveling laptop doesn’t have the image processing software that I usually employ to resize these things, so for now I’ll just share this one. It’s a sandstone from South Dakota, age unknown, which shows beautiful parallel …

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