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20 March 2019

The Dinosaur Artist, by Paige Williams

A book review of Paige Williams’ “The Dinosaur Artist,” a tale of international trade in dinosaur skeletons.

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9 February 2018

Friday fold: Taiwanese metasediments

This Friday, in search of a Friday fold, we head to Taiwan, not far from the epicenter of this week’s destructive earthquake(s).

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1 December 2017

People and Pyroclastics: Mount Agung at the Confluence of Science and Society

A guest post from an American expat living in east Bali, displaced with his family from their home due to Mount Agung’s recent eruption, and trying to help out as best he can.

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5 November 2016

Travels in Siberia, by Ian Frazier

I’ve let my subscription to the New Yorker lapse, but before I did, I was pleased to read each week its diverse suite of authors on a diverse suite of topics. This has been a source of surprising delight on several occasions, and has allowed me to discover not only topics I never thought to be interested in, but also authorial voices I never would have otherwise read. I’m reminded …

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8 January 2016

Friday fold: Cho La Pass, Himalayas

Today’s Friday fold comes from Martin Schmidt, who has shared a few previous folds with Mountain Beltway readers. It shows a folded ptygmatic vein from the Himalayas. Pretty sweet, amiright? Thanks, Martin. Happy Friday, all!

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6 November 2015

Friday fold: ptygmatic in northern India

Another image from northern India’s Himalayas, courtesy of Martin Schmidt: The “intestine-like” aspect of this fold has a descriptive adjective in geology: ptygmatic. Gorgeous! Thanks for sharing, Martin. Happy Friday!

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30 October 2015

Friday fold: Himalayas, northern India

My colleague Martin Schmidt of the McDonogh School, who I know through the National Association of Geoscience Teachers eastern section, recently shared a bunch of fold photos with me. They have a “dated” feel because they were originally shot on slide film, but the folds themselves of course are timeless. I’ll be featuring a bunch of them here in the weeks to come. Here’s a scene Martin captured in northern …

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3 March 2014

Pieces of the beginning, via Chelyabinsk

A week ago today, I was in Tempe, Arizona, at Arizona State University, for a workshop on broadening participation (increasing diversity) in the geosciences. One of the neat things about ASU as a setting for this meeting is their enormous meteorite collection. I was particularly taken with the display of material from the extraordinary Chelyabinsk meteor detonation that occurred last year. ASU has pieces of glass from windows that were …

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14 November 2013

The Road to Samarcand, by Patrick O’Brian

The week before last, I finished a fun adventure novel, The Road to Samarcand. This is the first book I’ve read by Patrick O’Brian that’s not part of his epic (21 books!) Aubrey-Maturin series. I chose it because it was available as a (free) download from my public library, which meant I could “read” it while driving in the car back and forth from the Fort Valley to Annandale. I’m …

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7 December 2012

Friday fold: Pakistani Perplexity

In last week’s Friday fold, I featured this image… …which prompted commenter Lynn David to ask, What’s going on to the west side of that red/green rock cored syncline in #2? It looks like some sort of disconformity but then I looked closer (and man, does that rock redden up) and it appears that the synclinal axis suddenly gets smashed up against “something” – possibly a fault of a different …

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