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30 September 2011

Friday fol(r)d

Straight-limbed open synform in an organic-rich formation of limited areal extent, featuring some brittle extensional features at the hinge. Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, summer 2011. (The bridge was broken before we got there.)

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28 September 2011

Roadside wonders of Route 287

Northern Colorado’s route 287 connects Fort Collins, Colorado with Laramie, Wyoming. Along its length, it displays roadcuts into Archean-aged basement complex. Two of these outcrops are featured in this post: one metamorphic (mostly), and a second igneous (mostly), with some intriguing polka-dotted plutons.

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20 June 2011

“Boudinage” is my favorite geology word

The current edition of the Accretionary Wedge geology blog carnival (hosted by Evelyn Mervine of Georneys) is built ´╗┐´╗┐around the theme of favorite geology words. My favorite geology word is derived from the French boudin, for sausage. It’s “boudinage,” and it’s best said with a heavy French accent and a leering, dirty expression. “Boo-din-ahhdj” I love pronouncing it; it’s a delicious word, like a good boudin itself. So what is …

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23 May 2011

Geology LOLcats 3

This morning, my cat Lola (a.k.a. “LOLa”) had squirmed herself in between the sheets, and it reminded me of something: If this pose inspires you to another LOLcat caption, you can click through for the original image file, unadorned. Modify it as you like, and give us a link to your creation in the comments on this post! Have fun.

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20 May 2011

Geology LOLcats 1

Dana posted early this morning with an invitation to “LOLcat” with a geological flavor. Here’s the best I could come up with: If you’re not familiar with the LOLcat genre, you might want to take a look at a random sampling of LOLcat images for context. Yes: I have the day off today, and can indulge in silliness like this!

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24 April 2011

Superposition in my lint trap

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20 April 2011

Just add water

My friend JT, who got her MS in geology at the University of Maryland when I did, is now at the Colorado School of Mines working on her PhD in Environmental Science and Engineering. A water main broke outside her house this morning, and I’m pleased that her first thought was to photo-document the resulting sedimentary structures for me. She says: “14 inch water main broke and there was a …

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9 April 2011

Plaster joint

Here’s a joint extracted from gelatin during this year’s GMU structural geology “Make a Joint” exercise: A soda bottle full of congealed gelatin serves a “rock.” We then use construction clamps to impart a stress field to the gelatin bottle. Into it, we inject fluid plaster of Paris. The extra pore fluid pressure causes a joint to form, displaying all the characteristic anatomy. Here’s the other side: Here are some …

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5 March 2011

Buzzard Rock

Took a hike this morning with my bride-to-be, out to Buzzard Rock on the northeastern corner of Massanutten Mountain. There, we observed numerous boulders of Massanutten Sandstone float, many bearing charismatic cross-beds. Here’s one more slab of float, presumably weathered out along the main bed, showing gorgeous internal cross-stratification: A closer look at the left side of this sample, animated via GIF: Why animated? Because I can. The object of …

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31 January 2011

Accretionary Wedge #30: the Bake Sale

The 30th edition of the “Accretionary Wedge” blog carnival is hosted at Mountain Beltway. A delectable array of foods, mainly dessert, are displayed. The treats demonstrate a wide array of geologic processes. Eat, drink, and be geologic!

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