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You are browsing the archive for 2018 May.

25 May 2018

Friday fold: 3D model of intense folding

This is a block of rock I found in the rock garden at Northern Arizona University a few weeks ago: It’s intensely folded. Not sure what kind of rock it is, but it was quite dense.

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18 May 2018

Friday fold: Corsican blueschist sheath fold

The Friday fold takes us to the French Mediterranean island of Corsica. Are you ready to dip into the blueschist facies in search of sheath folds?

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13 May 2018

A Most Improbable Journey, by Walter Alvarez

As mentioned the week before last, Walter Alvarez has a new book out. I’ve read it. It’s good. It’s Alvarez’s take on what he calls “Big History” – the story that spans the cosmos, the Earth, life, and humanity. It’s pretty great for the reasons that Alvarez’s other books are excellent – his voice is calm, appreciative, and patient. His language is accessible and appropriate (though I will grouse that …

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10 May 2018

Last Stand, by Michael Punke

A reader of this blog recently recommended Michael Punke’s Last Stand. I thoroughly enjoyed his novel The Revenant, and so last week I started the audiobook version of the nonfictional Last Stand (2007). Last Stand is subtitled “George Bird Grinnell, the Battle to Save the Buffalo, and the Birth of the New West.” Prior to reading it, I knew little of Grinnell, save that he was a conservationist, and that he …

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7 May 2018

2/3 pass rate on determining geopetal “up”

A visual challenge via Twitter to determine stratigraphic younging direction ends with equivocal results. So let’s use GIGAmacro imagery to school your sedimentological students on how three primary sedimentary structures look different right-side-up versus up-side-down.

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