Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Paleoceanography Archives - GeoSpace.

8 February 2017

Greenland Ice Sheet melting can cool subtropics and alter climate

A new study finds evidence that the last time Earth was as warm as it is today, cold freshwater from a melting Greenland Ice Sheet circulated in the Atlantic Ocean as far south as Bermuda, elevating sea levels and altering the ocean’s climate and ecosystems.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


13 January 2016

Ocean circulation changes may have killed cold-water corals

Successive and abrupt changes in North Atlantic ocean circulation over the past 4,500 years seem to have caused major reductions in some cold-water coral ecosystems, finds a study published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

The new study shows changes in sea surface circulation over the last few thousand years were more sudden than previously thought and in some cases led to abrupt collapses of cold-water coral ecosystems. The researchers found the first evidence that perturbations in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) led to cold-water coral ecosystems decline from 100 to 1,200 years ago.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


1 December 2015

Seismic risk in eastern Mediterranean higher than previously estimated

The eastern Mediterranean is more seismically active than previously assumed, a new study finds. On a geological time scale, seismic activity around the island of Crete has generated large earthquakes in bursts, potentially increasing the future risk for earthquakes and tsunamis in the region.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


20 October 2015

Formation of coastal sea ice in North Pacific drives ocean circulation and climate

An unprecedented analysis of North Pacific ocean circulation over the past 1.2 million years has found that sea ice formation in coastal regions is a key driver of deep ocean circulation, influencing climate on regional and global scales.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


3 June 2014

Modern ocean acidification is outpacing ancient upheaval, study suggests

Some 56 million years ago, a massive pulse of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere sent global temperatures soaring. In the oceans, carbonate sediments dissolved, some organisms went extinct and others evolved.
Scientists have long suspected that ocean acidification caused the crisis—similar to today, as manmade carbon dioxide combines with seawater to change its chemistry. Now, for the first time, scientists have quantified the extent of surface acidification from those ancient days, and the news is not good: the oceans are on track to acidify at least as much as they did then, only at a much faster rate.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>