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6 August 2019

How the Pacific Ocean influences long-term drought in the Southwestern U.S.

New research explores what conditions in the ocean and in the atmosphere prolong droughts in the Southwestern U.S. The answer is complex, according to a study published Aug. 6 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

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31 July 2019

Decades-old pollutants melting out of Himalayan glaciers

New research in AGU’s Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres finds chemicals used in pesticides that have been accumulating in glaciers and ice sheets around the world since the 1940s are being released as Himalayan glaciers melt as a result of climate change.

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24 June 2019

Atmospheric rivers getting warmer along U.S. West Coast

Most of the West Coast of the United States relies on a healthy winter snowpack to provide water through the dry summer months. But when precipitation falls as rain rather than snow, it can diminish summer water supplies, as well as trigger floods and landslides. A new study in AGU’s Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres finds atmospheric rivers –plumes of moisture that deliver much of the west’s precipitation—have gotten warmer over the past 36 years.

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5 June 2019

Feeling Heat on the Roof of the World

The Tibetan Plateau, also known as the “roof of the world,” is getting hotter. This process is especially fast in places marked by retreating snow, according to new research.

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3 June 2019

Loss of Arctic sea ice stokes summer heat waves in southern U.S.

Over the last 40 years, Arctic sea ice thickness, extent and volume have declined dramatically. Now, a new study finds a link between declining sea ice coverage in parts of the Canadian Arctic and an increasing incidence of summer heat waves across the southern United States.

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23 May 2019

New Studies Increase Confidence in NASA’s Measure of Earth’s Temperature

A new assessment of NASA’s record of global temperatures revealed that the agency’s estimate of Earth’s long-term temperature rise in recent decades is accurate to within less than a tenth of a degree Fahrenheit, providing evidence that past and future research is correctly capturing rising surface temperatures.

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24 April 2019

Uncovering polynya: new research unravels 43-year-old Antarctic mystery

Researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi have discovered how the Maud-Rise Polynya that was initially spotted in Antarctica in 1974, reappeared in September 2017 at the same location.

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22 April 2019

Microbes hitch a ride on high-flying dust

High-altitude dust may disperse bacterial and fungal pathogens for thousands of miles, seeding far-flung ecosystems and potentially impacting human health

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16 April 2019

Dust toll in Africa exceeds deaths from HIV

New modeling indicates mineral dust from the Sahara is the biggest contributor to air pollution-related premature deaths on the African continent.

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26 October 2018

Study finds unexpected levels of bromine in power plant exhaust

Some coal-fired power plants in the United States emit gases that may produce harmful compounds in drinking water and can have significant effects on the atmosphere, according to new research. A new study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, finds unexpectedly high levels of reactive bromine-containing chemicals in plumes emitted by coal-fired power plants not using a particular type of exhaust-cleaning technology.

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