Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres Archives - GeoSpace.

15 October 2019

Radioactive chlorine from nuclear bomb tests still present in Antarctica

Antarctica’s ice sheets are still releasing radioactive chlorine from marine nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s, a new study finds. This suggests regions in Antarctica store and vent the radioactive element differently than previously thought. The results also improve scientists’ ability to use chlorine to learn more about Earth’s atmosphere.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


17 September 2019

Scientists identify weather event behind extreme cold in Europe and Asia during February 2018

In the new study, researchers tested their hypothesis that a chain of events in the troposphere caused the sudden stratospheric warming and subsequent splitting of the polar vortex.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


12 September 2019

Lightning flashes illuminate storm behavior

Anybody who has ever tried to photograph lightning knows that it takes patience and special camera equipment. Now, a new study is using those brief but brilliant flashes to illuminate cloud structures and shed light on storm cell behavior, giving weather forecasters new tools for predicting lightning hazards.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


10 September 2019

Lightning ‘superbolts’ form over oceans from November to February

The lightning season in the Southeastern U.S. is almost finished for this year, but the peak season for the most powerful strokes of lightning won’t begin until November, according to a newly published global survey of these rare events.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


6 August 2019

How the Pacific Ocean influences long-term drought in the Southwestern U.S.

New research explores what conditions in the ocean and in the atmosphere prolong droughts in the Southwestern U.S. The answer is complex, according to a study published Aug. 6 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


31 July 2019

Decades-old pollutants melting out of Himalayan glaciers

New research in AGU’s Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres finds chemicals used in pesticides that have been accumulating in glaciers and ice sheets around the world since the 1940s are being released as Himalayan glaciers melt as a result of climate change.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


24 June 2019

Atmospheric rivers getting warmer along U.S. West Coast

Most of the West Coast of the United States relies on a healthy winter snowpack to provide water through the dry summer months. But when precipitation falls as rain rather than snow, it can diminish summer water supplies, as well as trigger floods and landslides. A new study in AGU’s Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres finds atmospheric rivers –plumes of moisture that deliver much of the west’s precipitation—have gotten warmer over the past 36 years.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


5 June 2019

Feeling Heat on the Roof of the World

The Tibetan Plateau, also known as the “roof of the world,” is getting hotter. This process is especially fast in places marked by retreating snow, according to new research.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


3 June 2019

Loss of Arctic sea ice stokes summer heat waves in southern U.S.

Over the last 40 years, Arctic sea ice thickness, extent and volume have declined dramatically. Now, a new study finds a link between declining sea ice coverage in parts of the Canadian Arctic and an increasing incidence of summer heat waves across the southern United States.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


23 May 2019

New Studies Increase Confidence in NASA’s Measure of Earth’s Temperature

A new assessment of NASA’s record of global temperatures revealed that the agency’s estimate of Earth’s long-term temperature rise in recent decades is accurate to within less than a tenth of a degree Fahrenheit, providing evidence that past and future research is correctly capturing rising surface temperatures.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>