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24 May 2017

Lucy Jones: scientists need to create “scientifically-defensible” stories

Lucy Jones: scientists need to create “scientifically-defensible” stories

Scientists have an obligation to communicate what they know in a way that ensures it can be understood and acted upon by policymakers, seismologist Lucy Jones told attendees at the JpGU-AGU joint meeting this week.

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17 April 2017

Harnessing the communicative power of art in science education

Harnessing the communicative power of art in science education

“From a young age, I began to understand that artists describe and interpret the world around them. In this way, they perform a task quite similar to that of a scientist.”

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20 March 2017

Facebook Live for #scicomm

Facebook Live for #scicomm

By Shane M Hanlon There are so many venues for science communication, especially when it comes to social media. For example, AGU alone has four official Twitter accounts (Sharing Science, AGU, Eos, Science Policy), an Instagram account, and a half-dozen Facebook pages. Social media is a powerful venue for communicating tips on communication. Twitter is an especially great place to learn about #scicomm resources and opportunities through hashtags like #scicomm, …

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8 March 2017

#MySciComm: Dr. Shane Hanlon

#MySciComm: Dr. Shane Hanlon

Wonder how to get into a career in #scicomm? Our own Shane M Hanlon shares his journey. Hint – it was not direct.

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3 March 2017

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions – Final Thoughts

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions - Final Thoughts

By Christy Till. This is the 3rd part in a 3-part series in which a US scientist reflects on the women’s march, making sense of the current political landscape, and finding answers in local science communication activities. See part one here and two here.   “Polarizing people is a good way to win an election, and also a good way to wreck a country.”  – Molly Ivins Perhaps some of the …

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1 March 2017

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions- So…Now What?

Finding Forward Momentum in Local Actions- So...Now What?

A US scientist’s reflections on the women’s march, making sense of the current political landscape, and finding answers in local science communication activities – Part 2.

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26 January 2017

Science politicians: a new path in non-academic careers

Science politicians: a new path in non-academic careers

What do you get when you mix a dearth of academic science positions and an under-representation of scientists in politics? Science politicians.

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16 January 2017

The need for action through scicomm

The need for action through scicomm

By Shane M Hanlon “What do you do?” This is a question that I’m asked almost daily as a DC resident where interest in one’s profession is only surpassed by interest in politics. But back in 2010, when I was a 2nd-year PhD student, I was not used to this question. I had successfully avoided (i.e. didn’t try) making friends outside of my program during my first year, so when I …

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3 November 2016

Sharing Science at Fall Meeting!

Sharing Science at Fall Meeting!

Planning your AGU16 schedule? Be sure to check out the Sharing Science Room for all the science communication, policy, and outreach events!

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8 August 2016

A silent threat: Raising awareness about arsenic in well water

A silent threat: Raising awareness about arsenic in well water

This is a guest post by graduate student Brittany Huhmann as part of our ongoing series of posts where we ask students to share their experiences in science communication. As a Ph.D. student, I spend a lot of time testing soils and groundwater for arsenic in far-off places like Bangladesh and India. Arsenic is a well-known carcinogen that negatively impacts millions of people in these and other south and southeast Asian countries. But …

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