9 August 2016

Work or pleasure? Taking a geoscientist on vacation

Work or pleasure? Taking a geoscientist on vacation

I’m getting ready to take my first long vacation-with-friends in quite a while, and I’m very happy to be following the trend of geologists going to Iceland. Suffice to say that there will be scads of photos when I’m there, when I get back, and probably for a few months afterwards. (Can you tell I’m excited?)

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



27 June 2016

Yellowstone hot springs: Upsetting your color scale

Yellowstone hot springs: Upsetting your color scale

I was fortunate enough to spend several weeks in Yellowstone National Park this summer, doing geophysical surveys in hydrothermal areas. I’ll be talking about those elsewhere in a few weeks (keep an eye on the AGU Instagram!), but in the meantime I wanted to show off some of the other excellent features of the park. Fieldwork in Yellowstone – and especially fieldwork with electrical equipment – is at the mercy of …

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



23 May 2016

Making the fieldwork count

Making the fieldwork count

I’m in the midst of preparing for field work, and it got me to thinking about the public perception of how geologists do research. A lot of us probably extol our chosen profession because of the opportunity for working outside of an office – I know it’s one of the reasons I often bring up when I’m asked why I love volcanology. But I also find that when people follow …

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



19 April 2016

Common sense and volcano tourism

Common sense and volcano tourism

It’s not very often that I comment on news articles, but a reader of the blog recently brought this one to my attention, and it hits close to home. The article is in the Washington Post’s Travel section and is entitled, “In Guatemala, a treacherous hike to one of the world’s most active volcanoes”. That title pretty much covers why I’m so upset – and conflicted – about the author of the piece is writing about.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (2) >>



1 April 2016

Geomancy for the mundane geologist – “Games Wizards Play” by Diane Duane

Geomancy for the mundane geologist - "Games Wizards Play" by Diane Duane

I don’t often do book reviews on here (Callan is your go-to guy for that), but I recently finished a novel by one of my favorite authors and I really wanted to write about it. Diane Duane, if you’re not familiar with her, is the author of a long-running series about wizards. But not just any wizards – in her version of the universe, which is very similar to our own, wizardry is a science in and of itself.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



26 February 2016

Resurrected post: Earth science-y catchphrases

Resurrected post: Earth science-y catchphrases

My father and I share a habit: we tend to point out and grumble over certain catchphrases we hear or read in a news report, mostly because they’re misused, overused, or just plain don’t make sense. He dislikes things such as “address the issue” or “touch base” or “spearhead”. Me? I make faces when I hear Earth science terms getting co-opted.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (1)>>



3 February 2016

Recognize an early-career geoscientist for excellence

Recognize an early-career geoscientist for excellence

Now that AGU is accepting nominations for this year’s awards (the deadline is March 15), I thought I’d throw out a pitch for the early career awards – and particularly the one that I’m most heavily involved in, the Science For Solutions Award.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



15 January 2016

Hunting blueschist (with bonus newt)

Hunting blueschist (with bonus newt)

My first hike of the new year was to the Lexington Reservoir near Los Gatos. Fellow USGS postdoc Kayla Iacovino (@kalyai) came along to help search for blueschist-facies rocks in what’s locally known as Franciscan Complex melange. Now, I’m getting pretty good at spotting serpentinite – not that it isn’t fairly distinctive – but I’ve been hoping to see some blueschist as well. I found this USGS publication which shows a sample of blueschist from a spot “near” Lexington Reservoir in Santa Clara county, so that was where we headed.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



31 December 2015

2015 through a geologist’s eyes

2015 through a geologist's eyes

It’s the last day of my eighth year of blogging. I’ve had a pretty amazing year, and though I haven’t gotten to writing about every bit of it, I’ve amassed some great photos of my travels. So here are a few things you’ve already seen, and a preview of a few things yet to come!

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (4) >>



18 December 2015

AGU Fall Meeting 2015: Guide TO Conference-Goers

AGU Fall Meeting 2015: Guide TO Conference-Goers

You’ve probably seen all the excellent “How to navigate a conference” posts that pop up in the fall and winter each year, and they’re great, but this isn’t one of them. My take is a little different; I’m going to give you a kind of bird-watcher-style guide to the people you’re sure to meet every year at AGU Fall Meeting. Many of us fall into one or more of these categories, depending on the ways we find to survive the whirlwind conference week.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (3) >>