25 October 2016

Wastewater disposal likely induced February 2016 magnitude 5.1 Oklahoma earthquake

Wastewater disposal likely induced February 2016 magnitude 5.1 Oklahoma earthquake

Distant wastewater disposal wells likely induced the third largest earthquake in recent Oklahoma record, the February 13, 2016, magnitude 5.1 event roughly 32 kilometers (nearly 20 miles) northwest of Fairview, Oklahoma, according to a new study.

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18 October 2016

Soil moisture, snowpack data could help predict ‘flash droughts’

Soil moisture, snowpack data could help predict 'flash droughts'

New research suggests “flash droughts” — like the one that unexpectedly gripped the Southern Rockies and Midwest in the summer of 2012 — could be predicted months in advance using soil moisture and snowpack data. Researchers analyzed the conditions leading up to the 2012 drought, which ultimately caused $30 billion in economic losses, looking for any warning signs that a drought was on the way.

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13 October 2016

Fires fueled by grass, crops can produce dangerous air pollutants

Fires fueled by grass, crops can produce dangerous air pollutants

Grass and crop fires can emit more of certain types of hazardous fumes than wood fires, a new study finds. Results from the study could help scientists better understand the dangers from fire emissions, allowing firefighters or individuals close to a fire to react more appropriately, according to the study’s authors.

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11 October 2016

Large precipitation events critical in replenishing groundwater resources

Large precipitation events critical in replenishing groundwater resources

Large precipitation events that occur about every 10 years are a critical source of recharge for replenishing groundwater resources, according to a new study. Groundwater is a vital source of water in the western United States and will be increasingly important with continued population growth and climate variability. Understanding the role of these large recharge events in replenishing aquifers and sustaining water supplies is crucial for long-term groundwater management.

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29 September 2016

Research suggests Saturn’s moon Dione may harbor a subsurface ocean

Research suggests Saturn’s moon Dione may harbor a subsurface ocean

A subsurface ocean could lie deep within Saturn’s moon Dione, according to a new study using publicly available data from the Cassini mission to Saturn. In 2013, images from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft hinted that Dione had a subsurface ocean when the moon formed, but the new study suggests the ocean could still exist today.

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27 September 2016

New research explores how wetlands and agriculture could be causing a global rise in methane

New research explores how wetlands and agriculture could be causing a global rise in methane

New research shows recent rises in methane levels in the atmosphere are most likely driven by biological sources, such as swamp gas, cow burps, or rice fields, rather than fossil fuel emissions.

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23 September 2016

Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom: The Underwater Flying Glider

Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom: The Underwater Flying Glider

What’s a glider? It is an underwater robot that “flies” around the sea going from the surface to the bottom of the seafloor collecting different types of science data.

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21 September 2016

Sikuliaq week 2 recap

Sikuliaq week 2 recap

We’ve done a lot of science this week! Since the last update, we’ve successfully towed the super sucker, started multi-coring, and upped our CTD tally to a whopping 87 casts, plus all the continuous surface underway data we’ve collected while steaming between sites. The scientists have some preliminary results and ideas about where they’d like to visit again (the beginning of the Wainwright line is of particular interest).

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Human activities rattle natural rock of Utah’s Rainbow Bridge

Human activities rattle natural rock of Utah’s Rainbow Bridge

Utah’s iconic Rainbow Bridge hums with natural and man-made vibrations, according to a new study accepted for publication today in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. The study found both natural waves in Lake Powell and induced earthquakes in Oklahoma cause the rock bridge to vibrate at different resonant frequencies.

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19 September 2016

Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom: Sampling from the Sea

Ms. Callaghan's Classroom: Sampling from the Sea

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the National Science Foundation’s R/V Sikuliaq. Jil Callaghan is a 6th grade science teacher at Houck Middle School in Salem, Oregon. She is posting blogs for her students while aboard the Sikuliaq as part of a teacher at sea program through Oregon State University. Read more posts here. Track the Sikuliaq’s progress here. By Jil …

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