15 July 2015

Greenland’s fjords are far deeper than previously thought, and glaciers will melt faster, researchers find

Greenland’s fjords are far deeper than previously thought, and glaciers will melt faster, researchers find

West Greenland’s fjords are vastly deeper than rudimentary models have shown, allowing intruding ocean water to badly undercut glacier faces, which will raise sea levels around the world much faster than previously estimated. Those are the findings of a University of California-Irvine-led research team that battled rough waters and an onslaught of icebergs for three summers to map the remote channels for the first time.

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29 June 2015

Beijing quadrupled in size in a decade, new study finds

Beijing quadrupled in size in a decade, new study finds

A new study shows that Beijing quadrupled in physical extent between 2000 and 2009. The new buildings alone — not including the impacts of additional city dwellers and their cars — increased heat and changed wind and pollution patterns in a ring around Beijing.

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9 June 2015

New Tool Could Track Space Weather 24 Hours Before Reaching Earth

New Tool Could Track Space Weather 24 Hours Before Reaching Earth

Our sun is a volatile star: explosions of light, energy and solar materials regularly dot its surface. Sometimes an eruption is so large it hurls magnetized material into space, sending out clouds that can pass by Earth’s own magnetic fields, where the interactions can affect electronics on satellites, GPS communications or even utility grids on the ground.

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3 June 2015

Rebuilding Sandbars in the Grand Canyon

Sandbar on the Colorado River - 65 miles

The Grand Canyon is a bit closer to how it was before one of the country’s largest dams was installed upstream. Three years of releasing water from Glen Canyon Dam to generate controlled floods has resulted in rebuilding sandbars in the Grand Canyon, according to a new USGS article published in Eos, the daily Earth and space science website published by the American Geophysical Union. These simulated floods redistribute sand and mud, which helps develop this critical feature.

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2 June 2015

Flooding, erosion risks rise as Gulf of Mexico waves loom larger

Flooding, erosion risks rise as Gulf of Mexico waves loom larger

Waves in the northern Gulf of Mexico are higher than they were 30 years ago, contributing to a greater risk of coastal erosion and flooding in Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, according to a new study.

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29 May 2015

A shrinking Mercury is contracting in unexpected ways

A shrinking Mercury is contracting in unexpected ways

A global survey of the largest, most prominent fault scarps has revealed some unexpected wrinkles in the way Mercury has contracted.

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29 April 2015

Lucky break kept major hurricanes offshore since 2005

Lucky break kept major hurricanes offshore since 2005

For the last nine years the United States has dodged the hurricane bullet: No major tropical cyclones have made U.S. landfall. Such a remarkable “hurricane drought” has never been seen before – since records began in 1851. It beats the previous record of eight years from 1861-1868, say researchers who have looked into the probabilities of the unusual streak, what it means for the chances of hurricanes this year and whether or not insurance premiums reflect the risks. Their conclusion: the hurricane drought is mostly a matter of dumb luck.

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17 April 2015

Volcanic soundscapes reveal differences in undersea eruptions (+ video)

Volcanic soundscapes reveal differences in undersea eruptions (+ video)

New research matching different types of underwater volcanic eruptions with their unique sound signatures could help scientists better detect and understand emissions occurring on the seafloor.

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10 April 2015

The surprising strength of ‘rainpower’

The surprising strength of 'rainpower'

Torrential rains inside hurricanes might be acting as a control knob on these giant storms, reducing their intensity by as much as 30 percent, according to a new study.

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9 April 2015

New study finds small solar eruptions can have profound effects on unprotected planets

New study finds small solar eruptions can have profound effects on unprotected planets

On Dec. 19, 2006, the sun ejected a small, slow-moving puff of solar material. Four days later, this sluggish Coronal Mass Ejection was nevertheless powerful enough to rip away dramatic amounts of oxygen out of Venus’ atmosphere and send it out into space, where it was lost forever. Learning just why a small CME had such a strong impact may have profound consequences for understanding what makes a planet hospitable for life.

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