13 September 2016

Fungi make steep slopes more stable

Fungi make steep slopes more stable

Fungi are fantastic. They give us beer, bread and cheese. And if those delicious reasons aren’t sufficient, then here’s another: a new study suggests some fungi can help prevent shallow landslides and surface erosion.

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12 September 2016

Walking the line: DBO 6

Walking the line: DBO 6

Rachel’s team needs to be quick. The water samples must be kept in conditions as close to what they were collected in as possible. More to the point, the microscopic organisms in the water must be kept in similar conditions; these organisms might not react the same way to tests if they’re not kept in an environment they’re used to.

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8 September 2016

Into the Atlin wild

Into the Atlin wild

This is the second in a series of dispatches from Rebecca Fowler, a science writer documenting the work of scientists conducting fieldwork at the Atlin ophiolite in British Columbia.

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7 September 2016

Keep your Berings Strait

Keep your Berings Strait

Today is our first full day at sea after leaving the port of Nome yesterday morning. We’re traveling through the Bering Strait, headed toward a mooring about 30 miles off of Barrow, Alaska. (The mooring is actually that of Robert Pickart, a well known physical oceanographer who isn’t on this cruise.)

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Sikuliaq Video Dispatch: Tour the Sikuliaq

A video tour of the R/V Sikuliaq.

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Sikuliaq Dispatch: No Place Like Nome

Sikuliaq Dispatch: No Place Like Nome

The man I met on the plane ride here was right when he said the roads in Nome lead to rivers and to nowhere.

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6 September 2016

Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom

Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom

Hi everyone, my name is Jil Callaghan and I’m a 6th grade science teacher at Houck Middle School. I’ll be posting content for my students – who will be taught by Ms. Wright until my return in October – intermittently throughout the trip about the science done onboard. I’m looking forward to teaching from such a unique place!

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2 September 2016

A Tale of Atlin Ophiolite

A Tale of Atlin Ophiolite

This is the first in a series of dispatches from Rebecca Fowler, a science writer documenting the work of scientists conducting fieldwork at the Atlin ophiolite in British Columbia.

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An Arctic fixation

An Arctic fixation

Nitrogen fixation has always been thought to require warmth and a lot of light. But it turns out that’s not true. Surprisingly, nitrogen fixation is happening in the cold waters of the Chukchi Sea. Researchers found this to be the case during an Arctic research cruise in the summer of 2011. Is this a new phenomenon, or just newly noticed?

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Getting there

Getting there

If you look long enough, you’ll see it: Alaska is the silhouette of a scraggly old man. His face juts out defiantly into the cold of the Arctic Circle, neck stretched, as if willing the rest of the North American continent to follow across the finish line of the Bering Strait. He has sunken eyes, a huge nose and chin, and a long, thin beard of Aleutian Islands. The left nostril – that’s where we’re going. Nome.

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