27 January 2017

Global flood risk could increase five-fold with a 4-degree C temperature rise

Global flood risk could increase five-fold with a 4-degree C temperature rise

A new report looks at flood risk and economic damages under different global warming scenarios with temperature increases of 1.5 degrees Celsius, 2 degrees Celsius and 4 degrees Celsius. It concludes that, if global temperatures rise by 4 degrees Celsius, the flood risk in countries representing more than 70 percent percent of the global population and global GDP will increase by more than 500 percent.

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25 January 2017

Weather patterns, trans-Pacific pollution cause spring ozone spikes in SW US

Weather patterns, trans-Pacific pollution cause spring ozone spikes in SW US

Late spring and early summer is when the air quality is generally good across most of the United States. But newly published research details how a common springtime weather pattern and pollution transported from Asia often conspire to create unhealthy ozone levels for the desert southwest. The new study adds to a growing body of work that explores how ozone can occasionally push some areas of the desert southwest above federal air quality standards.

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24 January 2017

Bursts of methane may have warmed early Mars

Bursts of methane may have warmed early Mars

In a new study, researchers suggest early Mars may have been warmed intermittently by a powerful greenhouse effect. They found interactions between methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the early Martian atmosphere may have created warm periods when the planet could support liquid water on the surface.

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Arctic melt ponds form when meltwater clogs ice pores

Arctic melt ponds form when meltwater clogs ice pores

When spring comes to the Arctic, the breakup of the cold winter ice sheets starts at the surface with the formation of melt ponds. These pools of melted snow and ice darken the surface of the ice, increasing the amount of solar energy the ice sheet absorbs and accelerating melt. Now, researchers describe in a new study how these melt ponds form, solving a paradoxical mystery of how a pool of water actually sits atop highly porous ice.

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18 January 2017

Ice-free summers in Arctic Ocean could thwart Paris Agreement objectives

Ice-free summers in Arctic Ocean could thwart Paris Agreement objectives

A new study shows melting sea ice in the Arctic Ocean could put at risk the objectives of the Paris Agreement to address climate change. The study’s authors conclude that, due to the future increase in the sea ice-albedo feedback, global carbon dioxide emission levels would need to reach zero five to 15 years earlier than expected to meet targets set by the agreement, substantially increasing mitigation costs.

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17 January 2017

How darkness and cold killed the dinosaurs

How darkness and cold killed the dinosaurs

Climate scientists have now reconstructed how tiny droplets of sulfuric acid formed high up in the air after a large asteroid impact 66 million years ago. The new research shows the sulfuric acid cooled Earth’s climate for years to come.

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13 January 2017

Scientists try to mitigate methane, from cows

Scientists try to mitigate methane, from cows

There are about 33 million cattle in Mexico, where a few scientists are experimenting to concoct a cow diet that will reduce methane emissions.

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Changing atmospheric conditions may contribute to stronger ocean wave activity on the Antarctic Peninsula

Changing atmospheric conditions may contribute to stronger ocean wave activity on the Antarctic Peninsula

A new study provides important details on the extent of sea ice, which can protect ice shelves from the impacts of ocean storms, in the Antarctic Peninsula.

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5 January 2017

What was that rumble? New research compares earthquakes to explosions

What was that rumble? New research compares earthquakes to explosions

The earth shakes similarly after earthquakes and underground explosions, making it hard to distinguish between the two types of rumbling events. A new study aims to capture the subtle details of seismic signatures and ground deformation after an explosion to help scientists better differentiate between them.

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People aren’t the only beneficiaries of power plant carbon standards

People aren’t the only beneficiaries of power plant carbon standards

Research has shown that carbon emission standards for the power sector benefit human health. But new research shows they would also benefit crops and trees.

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