[wp_dfp_ad slot="Blogosphere_Leaderboard_728x90"]
Advertisement

25 August 2021

#AGURocks: BumbleBee Blues

The natural world abounds with beauty and science reveals deeper patterns that provoke new questions. Science is not only a wellspring of inspiration for musicians but the tools and data of the scientific process can be used to create music as well. For example, I have used mathematical algorithms that mimic the behavior of flocking birds, predator/prey cycles and the human cardiovascular system to create some of my music compositions.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



24 August 2021

#AntarcticLog: Science Education

Unlike many people in the sciences, I didn’t have much formal education myself. Much of what I’ve learned, I’ve learned on my feet, by wandering around behind scientists, watching and asking questions. All the more reason that the moment I first walked into the science classroom at my middle school looms large in my mind. 

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



13 August 2021

#AntarcticLog: Climate hope via Greta Thunberg

The International Panel on Climate Change released a report this week full of a big dollop of reality — the impact human life has had on global temperature — and a dose of hope — the potential to stem change if we act quickly.  I thought about what I could say about this through #AntarcticLog, skimmed through my nearly 200 comics, and stopped cold at the ones about Greta Thunberg.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



6 August 2021

#AntarcticLog: Warm in Any Weather 

T-shirt weather in the northern hemisphere makes me think about measures taken to endure the extreme environments at the poles. When it comes to staying warm in high winds and low temperatures, #AntarcticLog has it covered. 

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



4 August 2021

#AGURocks: Soon May the Kennicott Thin

We arrived in the small town of McCarthy, Alaska in early June 2021 to quantify the retreat of the Kennicott Glacier just up the valley. As part of a project under direction of Dr. Regine Hock, formerly at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and now at the University of Oslo, we measured glacial melt and installed weather stations on debris-covered ice, bare ice, and high up in the mountains.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



2 August 2021

Astrobiology Studies for Kids (ASK)

This summer, something beautiful and unique took place in the STEM education world. Run by Blue Marble Space Institute of Science (BMSIS), an online Astrobiology Studies for Kids (ASK) program invited undergraduate students from all over the world to discuss astrobiology with dozens of pre-teens. The topics ranged from exoplanets, planetary geology, and ocean worlds to space fungi, astrovirology, and cyborgs.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



30 July 2021

#AntarcticLog: So Chill

It’s frying hot in these parts, getting to be the Dog Days of Summer. So I thought I’d fill you in on the story behind some of the coolest science — and people — I know, while also filling you in on the sometimes serendipitous way that #AntarcticLog comics come together. 

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



26 July 2021

Community Science as a Method of #SciComm and #SciPol

Are you interested in breaking down jargon in your scientific field to be more inclusive of others?  I found a community-oriented science project did just that.  After receiving messages and questions about the state of water systems in Oklahoma during late spring/early summer of 2020, I knew there was an interest within my community to understand water quality.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



23 July 2021

#AntarcticLog: Talking climate change science & policy

Palmer Station sits right at the ocean’s edge, at the foot of the Marr Ice Piedmont — the foothills of the glacier. In just decades, the ice has receded at least a quarter of a mile, revealing hidden islands. At the same time, conditions have led penguins and other resident fauna and flora to alter their migrations and nesting patterns. It didn’t take me long to realize that everything at Palmer has to do with climate change.  The Antarctic Peninsula is warming at a rate five times that of the rest of the world — and demonstrates the future if climate change cannot be stemmed through human action.  

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



16 July 2021

#AntarcticLog: Feeling Dumb and Doodling – My Superpowers  

Every #AntarcticLog starts with a doodle: an image that comes to me while I’m reading or listening to or otherwise learning something; an image that leads to a story I’m about to tell in comic form. 

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>