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12 March 2021

#AntarcticLog: Antarctic Service Medal

Last week I received a special package in the mail: my Antarctic Service Medal, made for my contribution to U.S. efforts to understand the continent — and the planet. 

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#RhymeYourResearch: Carbon, You’re Key

Recently, I have been homeschooling one of my children. We got onto a geology kick while digging up various rocks on our walks in the woods. To better understand what we were finding, I read through a rocks and minerals handbook.

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8 March 2021

#VirtualFieldtrips: a supplementary educational tool in Covid-19 times

A virtual fieldwork can be useful in classes where students have the opportunity for a quick and realistic “visit” to a particular study area.

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5 March 2021

#AntarcticLog: Sanna’s Reindeer

Sanna Vannar is the president of Sáminuorro, the Swedish Association of Young Saami.  The Saami people span four nations: Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Russia. Sanna’s family have been reindeer herders for generations, which puts them in a unique position to evaluate the reindeer’s response to the changing northern climate.

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3 March 2021

#DrawnToGeoscience: Inspiration in Geoscience

For me, combining science & art always made natural sense. My foray into deliberately combining them came in junior high & high school when I delved into a 3-year long self-directed investigation into “What makes rocks ring?”.

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2 March 2021

Social Science, Social Media, and Serendipity

What could possibly have motivated me to boldly attempt a social science research project in the middle of a geophysics PhD? Serendipity.

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26 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Canaries in the Coal Mine

When it come to climate change and its impact on the animal world, there’s more than one “canary in the coal mine.” To mix a few potent metaphors, the dominoes are falling — and, if it’s true that God is in the details, it’s fair to say that individual animals help tell the story.  As I work to make climate change science accessible and comprehensible through #AntarcticLog, I’ve found myself leaning on keystone species.  The assortment featured here tell separate stories about the effects of global warming, and they add up to a clear picture of what’s happening. 

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22 February 2021

Keeping socially connected with science podcasts

March 2020 may have marked the closure of gates to physical spaces for science engagement, but it also opened the portal to new social spaces to keep the science conversations going. This is exactly what happened to my institution and a local arboretum, where an existing partnership that relied upon on-site programming found a new way to continue and grow our collaborations.

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19 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Ivan the Terrabus

Finally, lest you think my life is all blissful polar adventure, let me share a regret: I have not yet ridden in Ivan the Terrabus, the most excellent vehicle that carries people from the airstrip to the home-away-from-home  known as Mactown — McMurdo Station.  

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14 February 2021

#ScienceValentines – 2021 Edition

However you approach Valentine’s Day, at AGU we like to take the opportunity to celebrate scientific disciplines (and puns). 

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