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19 October 2020

Making Science Accessible for All

How hot is Jupiter? Can you show the process of chromosome segregation? How does the brain control movement in your leg? All this science seems complicated because of the scientific jargon but there is a lot more to experiencing these basic concepts of life than just reading some heavy worded paragraphs.

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25 September 2020

Drawn to Geoscience: Crowdsourced science at the intersection of art and science

Today, I am an interdisciplinary researcher, environmentalist, artist, and educator that employs art-based research methods in tandem with Western science methods to study environmental issues in the field. But life didn’t start out that way.

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9 September 2020

Want to do outreach but don’t know where to start? We got you.

Science communication is a catch-all phrase that means so many things. Even when narrowing it down to scientists talking about their research to (mostly) non-scientists, there are still so many avenues and places to start.

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17 August 2020

International Observe the Moon Night: An Opportunity for Global Outreach

International Observe the Moon Night is an annual worldwide public engagement program that encourages observation, appreciation, and understanding of our Moon and its connection to planetary science and exploration. It is also a time to celebrate our personal and cultural connections to Earth’s nearest celestial neighbor.

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12 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Spot the Differences

During the first few weeks of lockdown, I spent my weekends coloring microbes, soil, and Sonoran Desert-themed drawings. In addition, I started following scientist who use art for #SciComm and science artists on social media. I was extremely inspired by Drs. Karen Vaughan and Yamina Pressler’s For The Love Of Soil art prints. Fortunately, I was able to attend a live session hosted by Dr. Pressler on how to create whimsical soil profiles using watercolors. There was no turning back from there.

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5 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Imaginations to animations

As a kid, I could sit quietly for hours entertaining myself if I were handed a pen and a paper. Now as an adult, I still find myself doodling and sketching when I’m bored, or when I’m trying to explain something. Putting imaginations and thoughts into drawings is apparently a useful skill later in life, also as a scientist. Illustrating processes and how things work, even in the most basic form, is a useful science communication tool. 

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4 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Drawing a clearer picture of dinosaurs

To me, being able to visualize an organism helps me understand their nature better, and this is especially important for organisms that no longer exist in the present day. I am endlessly taking in information that helps me see the larger picture of a creature within its environment and how it interacts with and within it.

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11 June 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: The Monument

*Google search: equipment needed to create a documentary.*

This is how my journey to creating The Monument began. In reality, it began before I made that search, in the months (that turned into years) of being rendered unable to shake a passion that gripped me—a passion to highlight and document the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, a hub for biodiversity in the western U.S., and to share its magnificence with the general public.

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3 June 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Go Forth and Science

Art is a thing I was really into when I was younger; I was totally that kid who took art classes outside of school, drew on napkins (and myself), and doodled in the margins of all my notebooks. But then I went to college, got sucked into the wonderful world of science, and let drawing fall off my list of usual activities.

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1 June 2020

Getting our message across with Water Pistols and a little bit of Poetry!!

As scientists we are all beginning to understand the importance of communicating our work to a wider audience than just our peers. Engaging the public helps us to dispel myths, create interest, educate and hopefully inspire the next generation of scientists. It’s also really good fun and adds a little variety to your work. So now I could be sitting at my desk one day and the next stood in front of large crowd brandishing water pistols and waving Lego figures at them. 

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