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16 November 2018

Register for scicomm workshops, Open Mic Night, & more at AGU18

AGU18 is…oh wow…less than a month away! We in the Sharing Science program are busily putting the final touches on all the content, logistics, swag, and more to make this the more Sharing Science-y meeting yet!

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5 November 2018

A Sense of Place: Recruiting Interest in Science and Discovery Through Storytelling and Outreach

By Jane Wolken Some memories of a place are so vivid that they trigger the senses: the sight of a brilliant orange sunset viewed from a cool rock outcrop on the shore of a remote lake; the sound of a squirrel chirping from the top of a white spruce tree laden with cones; the unique smell of Labrador tea; the tart taste of Alaskan blueberries; and the abrupt touch of …

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12 September 2018

Talking health might shift attitudes on global warming

By Shane M Hanlon Global warming is a political issue. It shouldn’t be, but it is. I recently wrote a post about it that outlined political views on the subject, probably best summarized by this1: Takeaway: majority of folks think that global warming is happening but views vary widely based on political affiliation. You might ask, “Yeah, but there are a bunch of different people in political parties. What about …

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11 September 2018

Share your field pictures w/ us (on Tumblr)!

As some of you might be aware, we have a (freaking awesome) Instagram account that features many of our scientists showing us their field sites, labs, outreach activities, etc. (if you’re not aware, you should really check it out). In addition to Instagram, we like to feature scientists in the field via our Postcards from the Field campaign through our  Tumblr account. where scientists share stories and photos from their field experiences.

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30 August 2018

Art asks questions, science seeks answers

This post is adapted from a post in a sister blog here.  By Adam Swanson Science and art are deeply related. Both involve looking hard at what is around us: taking time to observe and collect information to filter through brains. Art asks questions, science seeks answers. I have been drawing and painting since I was a child. I studied art in college and took it with me everywhere afterward. In …

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2 August 2018

American (voter) attitudes on climate change are complex

Americans have strong feelings about climate change. In addition to political affiliation, it turns out that how old you are can influence the degree to which you accept human-influenced clinate change

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6 July 2018

Holy worms: Historical depictions of Guinea Worm disease in Medieval art

This 15th-century altarpiece depicts St. Roch, a Catholic saint from the 14th century known for his work with plague victims. The prominent feature in this, and almost all depictions of St. Roch is the wound/mark on his upper thigh. It has been speculated to be a birthmark, a boil, or a sore and until recently, art historians said this particular piece shows a long drop of pus leaking from a wound. Now, researchers believe this actually depicts Guinea worm disease (GWD).

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14 June 2018

Up-Goer 5 at #AGU18 – submit your abstract early!

By Shane M Hanlon One of our favorite parts of our annual meeting is the Up-Goer 5 session that we host. Every year, scientists explain their research using the 1000 (ten-hundred) most common words in the English language. The results are fun, silly, heartfelt, surprising, and overall a great time. We’re doing it again this year and we want YOU to submit an abstract. Here’s the session: ED055: The Up-Goer …

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11 June 2018

The aspen forests are burning, #416fire

I wake each morning eager to go for a run on a mountain trail. I had a plan for June trail runs. Gudy’s Rest, then Animas Mountain, Telegraph Hill,  then Skyline, a return to Animas Mountain, and then pick higher elevation trails. Hermosa Creek Trail was slated to be next. It won’t be next. The area is ablaze, homes are evacuated, and its adjacent aspen forests are burning. Smoke fills the air across the Animas River Valley and throughout Durango, Colorado.

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29 May 2018

Webinars for scicomm: Consider me a convert

I thought webinars were basically lectures online, and don’t get me wrong, they can be. But I quickly realized that they can also be, and are, a great tool to share content and engage with audiences who normally wouldn’t be able to participate in person.

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