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6 April 2020

LabOratory Podcast: Lifting the Veil on the Science Community

What do you get when a scientist and a sound designer, both passionate about storytelling, communication, and the human experience, collaborate on a project together?

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30 March 2020

Geoscientists can help: Leveraging your science and communication skills to help tackle COVID19

Are you struggling, as a geoscientist, with what you can do to be useful during the Corona Crisis? Here is something that might help: If you are a geoscientist, you are also a scientist and probably a science communicator, and you can use both of those facts to help those around you find, understand, and share the latest information about the virus. Probably the best thing we can do as geoscientists is leverage our skills and training to share and amplify the important messages from the public health community.

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23 March 2020

To Make Science Relevant and Relatable, Share it in a Story

When I was a researcher, I studied fossils to discover their stories. As an educator, I infuse stories into science learning. Stories help us make sense of our world. And because I’m an advocate for sense-making, I’m here to say that stories are great and we need more of them.

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16 March 2020

The value of face-to-face virtual meetings for scicomm (& more)

Workplaces are set up for virtual work. Folks telework more and more. I personally attend a ton of meetings over  the phone. However, I’ll be the first one to admit that if I’m participating in a meeting via phone, my attention is not 100%* on the subject at hand.

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9 March 2020

Storytelling basics: The meat and ornaments of a story

Did you ever have a great idea, start that idea, then life hits you and that idea gets sidelined? That’s what happened w/ this series. But, I’m back, and there’s so much more storytelling to talk about!

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2 March 2020

Ocean Sciences 2020: SciComm, professional devo, non-academic advice, & more!

Last week was the Ocean Sciences (Oceans) meeting in San Diego, a joint a meeting between AGU, ASLO, and TOS. I personally love Oceans as it’s an opportunity to do my job while also having time to actually go to sessions.

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12 February 2020

The Geology Project: Bilingual Geoscience Communication by Bilingual Geoscientists

During the AGU Fall Meeting 2019, I presented a talk on The Geology Project (TGP). TGP is a social media-based geoscience communication enterprise with special focus on providing content in both Spanish and English. Based in Puerto Rico, TGP is run by five young Puerto Rican geoscientists, with one mission: communicating science to the world!

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10 February 2020

Widen Your Reach with Social Media

I recently read that in the United States alone, nearly 400,000 scientific papers are published each year. That’s a lot of competition for attention to your paper. How do you stand out in the crowd? Using social media can help.

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3 February 2020

Earth Observatory for Kids!

Satellites, stories, and hands-on science! Earth Observatory for Kids (EO Kids for short) ­is a free online publication that strives to share Earth science stories and data in a way that engages diverse young adults.

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21 January 2020

How do you know when it’s gonna blow? Two years of USGS participation in the Siskiyou Science Festival

For the past two years, the USGS has sent scientists to the Siskiyou Science Festival, which is held yearly in the largest nearby population center, Mt. Shasta City. The Festival has been an excellent opportunity to interact with CalVO stakeholders and maintain relationships with the communities around the volcano.

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