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30 October 2017

Drawn to Geoscience: Bat Poop Is Helping Scientists Study the Past

Animal poop holds many secrets. Our own JoAnna Wendel shares a comic, and the process behind the creation of the comic, about researchers’ work to identify past wet and dry periods using bat guano.

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Plain language supports science communication

By Kate Goggin. This post was originally published by the Center for Plain Language. I love helping scientists translate tech talk into plain language. Often the editing process goes smoothly, but sometimes, they have reservations. The fears I hear most often involve dumbing down the information, or, oversimplifying it. “Those are common complaints,” says Dr. Lisa DiPinto, Senior Scientist at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and one of my …

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24 October 2017

Tell a science story at Fall Meeting with Story Collider!

By Shane M Hanlon The Story Collider is excited to be hosting a storytelling event at AGU’s Fall Meeting in New Orleans on the night of Thursday, 14 December, as part of AGU’s Sharing Science programming at the meeting. We’re seeking true stories about your personal experiences about Earth and space science, especially those related to New Orleans and Louisiana, to be included in the show. These must be science …

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16 October 2017

Public outreach: Be mindful, not fearful

By Shane M Hanlon  One of the most important things to think about when reaching out, especially through means such as social or classic media, or writing letters to media outlets or journals, is that these mediums are public. What you say will be able to be seen by a wide audience and will be available to reference forever. This can be viewed as a barrier to prevent scientists from …

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9 October 2017

Share your science during Earth Science Week!

This week is the perfect time to start/expand your scicomm & outreach adventure!

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28 September 2017

#dataviz – The (not really) new form a scicomm

Data can be more than numbers on a spreadsheet. It can tell a beautiful story.

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21 September 2017

Scicommer: Have message, will travel.

Why don’t departmental seminar series include scientists who do scicomm? I think they should.

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15 September 2017

Connecting Science to Policy in New York

A group of student scientists went to meet with their congressional member. This is what happened.

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5 September 2017

What’s your dream science class?

What’s the class you’ve always wanted to take/teach? Let us know via #scidreamclass!

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28 August 2017

Communicating uncertainty in research to the public

By Madeleine Jepsen. This is the second of a two-part series on communicating uncertainty.  Whether it’s a congressman drafting legislation or a family member asking about your research at Thanksgiving dinner, explaining uncertainty in research to a lay audience is an important part of science communication. Recently, Joseph Guillaume, a postdoctoral fellow at Aalto University, published an analysis of how uncertainty is verbally communicated in scientific publications using abstracts from …

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