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14 September 2020

Making the switch from in-person to online scicomm storytelling shows

…for this post, I’m taking off my AGU hat (mostly) and stepping into one of my other roles as storyteller and producer. I also work for the science storytelling organization The Story Collider, where scientists and non-scientists alike tell true, personal stories, live on stage. Er…or at least they used to. 

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9 September 2020

Want to do outreach but don’t know where to start? We got you.

Science communication is a catch-all phrase that means so many things. Even when narrowing it down to scientists talking about their research to (mostly) non-scientists, there are still so many avenues and places to start.

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17 August 2020

International Observe the Moon Night: An Opportunity for Global Outreach

International Observe the Moon Night is an annual worldwide public engagement program that encourages observation, appreciation, and understanding of our Moon and its connection to planetary science and exploration. It is also a time to celebrate our personal and cultural connections to Earth’s nearest celestial neighbor.

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12 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Spot the Differences

During the first few weeks of lockdown, I spent my weekends coloring microbes, soil, and Sonoran Desert-themed drawings. In addition, I started following scientist who use art for #SciComm and science artists on social media. I was extremely inspired by Drs. Karen Vaughan and Yamina Pressler’s For The Love Of Soil art prints. Fortunately, I was able to attend a live session hosted by Dr. Pressler on how to create whimsical soil profiles using watercolors. There was no turning back from there.

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11 August 2020

Advocating for climate science

A growing number of scientists in the United States are politically active and engaged, especially around issues affecting science. And researchers have the right to participate in advocacy, even if they work for federal agencies or state-funded institutions. Despite this, we at the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund frequently speak with scientists deterred from advocacy after hearing of well-meaning colleagues who’ve been accused, for example, of violating anti-lobbying laws for writing an op-ed.

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5 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Imaginations to animations

As a kid, I could sit quietly for hours entertaining myself if I were handed a pen and a paper. Now as an adult, I still find myself doodling and sketching when I’m bored, or when I’m trying to explain something. Putting imaginations and thoughts into drawings is apparently a useful skill later in life, also as a scientist. Illustrating processes and how things work, even in the most basic form, is a useful science communication tool. 

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4 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Drawing a clearer picture of dinosaurs

To me, being able to visualize an organism helps me understand their nature better, and this is especially important for organisms that no longer exist in the present day. I am endlessly taking in information that helps me see the larger picture of a creature within its environment and how it interacts with and within it.

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3 August 2020

My name is Jacqui, and I am a science communicator.

My name is Jacqui, and I am a science communicator. There. I admit it.

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27 July 2020

Two scientists walk into a bar

Every few months, fifty scientists head out to bars around San Diego. Well, fifty more than a usual Thursday night. The event is called Two Scientists Walk Into A Bar and, more than just the start to a corny joke, it’s a science communication program designed to reveal scientists as the mere mortals we are.

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24 July 2020

Zoonotic Diseases: Plugging the Source Before the Flood

A whopping seventy-five percent of emerging diseases have been said to be zoonotic, meaning that such diseases can spread from wildlife to humans, an example being our current pandemic consisting of Covid-19 a bat-to-human infection.

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