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You are browsing the archive for Public outreach Archives - The Plainspoken Scientist.

12 May 2021

#AntarcticLog: Permafrost isn’t so frosty

Based on the last few thousand years, it’s supposed to be like this: After a winter freeze comes a spring thaw. Not that there isn’t plenty of evidence of climate change: tornadoes and a longer growing season are among the easiest to see. Toward the poles, however, where global warming is multiplied, bigger changes are afoot: underfoot, actually, as the permafrost layer thins, buckles, and crumbles.  

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#RhymeYourResearch: Memory of a Flower

“Memory of a Flower” was inspired by an article I read about the learning flights that honey- and bumblebees take after encountering a nectar-rich flower. These flights involve the bees repeatedly turning and facing towards the flower as they depart from it, studying its characteristics.

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6 May 2021

#AntarcticLog: Antarctic Artists

In these still socially-distanced times, one of the things I miss most is a good chin-wag. The chance to sit around the fire or the table, swapping yarns, seems a long way off.  Maybe next autumn?

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5 May 2021

DrawnToGeoscience: #CrochetYourPHD

It is always great to remember that science communication is a deep sea of learning, the more you dive in, the more secrets you will learn and the more treasures you will find. Bringing these treasures to the surface does not always require complex tools or extraordinary skills. You will be surprised if I told you that simple methods will work the best. From storytelling to science writing, the terms and the language you use really make a difference.

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3 May 2021

SciComm as Dialogue—not Monologue—in Appalachian Kentucky

Want to reach out to nontraditional geoscience stakeholders? Have you wondered how to engage them or who they might be in the first place? A pilot project in a five-county area of eastern Kentucky is showing us at the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) how we can go beyond traditional science communication strategies to reach new stakeholders and help them solve problems in their communities.

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22 April 2021

#RhymeYourResearch: anthropo-obscenity

Later on, in the peer-review for publication in Consilience Journal, the reviewers strongly suggested changing the last line and thus removing the explicit reference to Lilith’s Brood. With a heavy heart, I bowed to their arguments – mainly to make the poem more accessible for a wider audience. Still, killing my darling ‘oankali trade’ somehow feels like treason to one of my favorite writers.

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21 April 2021

Sharing #SciArt: #AGURocks, #DrawnToGeoscience, & #RhymeYourResearch

The goal was to not only showcase thee amazing ways of communicating science via art but to also show folks the creative process behind the creations; to pull back the curtain to hopefully lower the barrier(s) to entry for those who may have thought about scicomm via art but thought that it was too difficult/they didn’t have the talent.

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9 April 2021

#AntArcticLog: Narwhals, narwhals, swimming in the ocean (& other whales)…

One thing I never got to do a comic about during the time at Palmer Station were the whales. Whales spouting at a distance…breaching nearby…diving, fluking, flapping…and, in the gray gloom of an early winter morning, taking an audible inhale before disappearing under the surface, ahead of a background of icebergs.  I extended my comic coverage of whales to the Arctic, as well, for the Polar Whale series. 

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6 April 2021

#AntarcticLog: The movement of glaciers

With a rumble, a rush, a splash, a gush, the glacier that forms our dramatic backdrop makes like a cow — and calves — dropping a blockbuster baby of ice into Arthur Harbor. If you’re lucky, you whirl toward it in time to see the ice fall, far enough away that the wave it creates seems to form in slow motion.  Then the roar of the wave reaches your ears across the distance. 

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29 March 2021

How to be an effective STEM role model

By Jessica Taylor Several years ago, I became interested in training colleagues to work outreach events. I was specifically interested in addressing the gender gap in the sciences and making sure these interactions practiced gender equitable strategies.  With the help of my team we developed a role model training program. We pulled from great resources such as the SciGirls Role Model Strategy Guide, TechBridge’s Role Models Matter resources, and publications …

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