Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Public outreach Archives - The Plainspoken Scientist.

8 July 2020

The Deadliest Disease that had Claimed Many Lives in the Pre-Columbian Americas

One of the most well-known infectious diseases that had existed throughout history is Smallpox. The Variola virus is the type of virus that is involved in causing this disease. Smallpox tends to spread easily between one individual to another, which makes this disease highly contagious. Fever, vomiting, rashes, body aches, and fluid-filled blisters that are covered with scabs are the kind of symptoms that usually occur among Smallpox infected individuals.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


7 July 2020

First you were like, “whoa!” Then we were like, “WHOA!” And then you were like, “Fibropapillomatosis.”

There is currently a disease that is costing green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, more than just a fin or some “noggin” – it is taking their lives. Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a disease with a cause that is unknown. Here is what we know.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


6 July 2020

Viruses as Medicine for Antibiotic-Resistant Bacterial Infections

One of the most groundbreaking medical discoveries has been the development of phage therapy. Phage therapy refers to the use of bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, as a mechanism to defeat antibiotic resistant infections. Phage therapy was first researched due to the fact that, globally, 1.5 million people die from tuberculosis each year. 

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


3 July 2020

15 feet Tall and Threatened!

Wild giraffes across Africa are suffering from multiple skin disorders. The Rothschild’s giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis rothschild) population is shrinking at an alarming rate in Kenya and Uganda. Located in Uganda, Murchison Falls National Park (MFNP) did a survey in 2016 that discovered that one third of their giraffes had rash-like lesions of unknown origin.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


2 July 2020

Rabies: What Do You Really Know?

When people think of rabies, they are most likely visualizing an aggressive animal foaming at the mouth and ready to viciously attack any living thing in sight, but is this image always the case?

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


22 June 2020

Writing about wildlife diseases

It’s that time of year again when I head to rural Pennsylvania to teach a field course in disease ecology for undergraduates at my alma mater, the University of Pittsburgh. 

No it’s not. But it should be.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


19 June 2020

#AGURocks: Bromide Hill

The song “Bromide Hill” was inspired by the strange and tragic history of Oklahoma, which is also inextricably tied with the energy industry. I found Oklahoma amazingly beautiful as well, with very interesting geology as well as ecology. I wanted to write something personal, but also rooted in the history of this place (beyond just human history).

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


11 June 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: The Monument

*Google search: equipment needed to create a documentary.*

This is how my journey to creating The Monument began. In reality, it began before I made that search, in the months (that turned into years) of being rendered unable to shake a passion that gripped me—a passion to highlight and document the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, a hub for biodiversity in the western U.S., and to share its magnificence with the general public.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


1 June 2020

Getting our message across with Water Pistols and a little bit of Poetry!!

As scientists we are all beginning to understand the importance of communicating our work to a wider audience than just our peers. Engaging the public helps us to dispel myths, create interest, educate and hopefully inspire the next generation of scientists. It’s also really good fun and adds a little variety to your work. So now I could be sitting at my desk one day and the next stood in front of large crowd brandishing water pistols and waving Lego figures at them. 

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


29 May 2020

#AGURocks: Cover of the Science Mag

Ever since Nick Shackleton first showed his clarinette skills on one of the first ICP conferences (most likely on the ICP3 in Cambridge) it has become a habit to have a Paleomusicology concert the night before the conference ends. It used to be quite classical but it has become more casual during the last years.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>