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6 November 2009

Big Picture HiRISE Gallery!

Speaking of Mars art, the Big Picture blog (which all of you should be following by now) has a feature on images of Mars taken by HiRISE. Head on over and take a look. Mars is a really pretty and often bizarre-looking place. [PS – Have you voted today?]

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15 October 2009

Mars Art: HiRISE Dust Devils and Dusty Dunes

It’s been a while since I posted any “Mars art” but I just came across this Bad Astronomy post and had to share. The short explanation of the photo is that dust devils spiraling across these sand dunes have removed the red dust but left behind dark sand in artistic swirls. For a more detailed description, check out Bad Astronomy, and to take a closer look at the image itself, …

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27 April 2009

Pretty Dunes in Gale Crater

This is a tiny subframe from the HiRISE image PSP_009294_1750.

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13 April 2009

Dune Mars, Visiting Mars and Carnival #98!

It seems that the astro-blogs have Mars on the brain today! Bad Astronomy has a post about some mind-bendingly cool HiRISE pictures of dunes on Mars, and The Spacewriter has a post about Mars as a whole and Ganges Chasma in particular. And, if you’d like a little more diversity in your space-blogging, go check out the 98th Carnival of Space at Universe Today!

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20 March 2009

Grand Falls and Sand Dunes

(This is day 6 of a week-long field trip in Arizona. Get caught up with days 1,2,3,4,5) Today we visited Grand Falls and the nearby dune field. Grand Falls is especially interesting because it combines many of the processes that are active in shaping planetary surfaces. The falls are the result of a huge lava flow pouring into the ancient canyon of the Little Colorado river, filling the canyon and …

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19 March 2009

Meteor Crater, Walnut Canyon, and Red Mountain

(This is day 5 of a week-long planetary geology field trip to Arizona. Get caught up with days 1,2,3,4) Today was a long and awesome day. We started out at meteor crater, the youngest and best preserved impact crater on Earth! Our guide today was Shaun Wright, a colleague from the Hawaii field workshop, among other places. He showed us infrared images of the crater taken from an airplane and …

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16 March 2009

Sedona and Oak Creek Canyon

Today we made our way from Phoenix north to Flagstaff, and on the way stopped to check out some interesting geology in Sedona and Oak Creek Canyon. Sedona is famous for its spectacular red rocks, such as Bell Rock, which we clambered around on today. Bell Rock is made mostly of very fine-grained sandstone formed by windblown sand reworked by the advance and retreat of oceans in the early Permian …

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16 February 2009

The MOC "book": Dunes, Ripples and Streaks

This is the fourth in a series of posts about the huge paper by Malin and Edgett summarizing the results from the Mars Orbital Camera’s (MOC’s) primary mission. If you’re just tuning in, get caught up by reading the first three posts, and if you want to read along, download a pdf of the paper here. This week we’re looking at two sections: “Aeolian Processes and Landforms” and “Polar Processes …

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5 February 2009

The MOC "book": Surface Patterns and Properties

Welcome to part 2 of our attempt at tackling The Beast. If you missed Part 1, check it out here. We are working our way, slowly but surely, through the monstrous 2001 Mars Orbital Camera paper by Malin and Edgett. This paper summarizes the results from MOC, which revolutionized the scientific community’s view of Mars. This week we’re going to be looking at the section discussing surface patterns and properties. …

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30 January 2009

The MOC "Book": Introduction

When the Mars Global Surveyor arrived at Mars in 1997, it brought with it the most powerful camera ever placed in orbit around another planet, the Mars Orbital Camera (MOC). In 2001, the principal investigators of MOC, Mike Malin and Ken Edgett, published a massive 134 page paper, summarizing the results of the mission and revolutionizing the world’s view of Mars. Here in the MarsLab, the paper is fondly referred …

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