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23 September 2016

Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom: The Underwater Flying Glider

What’s a glider? It is an underwater robot that “flies” around the sea going from the surface to the bottom of the seafloor collecting different types of science data.

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21 September 2016

Sikuliaq week 2 recap

We’ve done a lot of science this week! Since the last update, we’ve successfully towed the super sucker, started multi-coring, and upped our CTD tally to a whopping 87 casts, plus all the continuous surface underway data we’ve collected while steaming between sites. The scientists have some preliminary results and ideas about where they’d like to visit again (the beginning of the Wainwright line is of particular interest).

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19 September 2016

Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom: Sampling from the Sea

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the National Science Foundation’s R/V Sikuliaq. Jil Callaghan is a 6th grade science teacher at Houck Middle School in Salem, Oregon. She is posting blogs for her students while aboard the Sikuliaq as part of a teacher at sea program through Oregon State University. Read more posts here. Track the Sikuliaq’s progress here. By Jil …

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Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom: Multi-coring

It was so cool to watch pieces of ice float by as we were working on deck! I’m standing next to the hose because we wash off the utensils (the metal sheet for cutting, the spatula used for scraping it into the bag, and the plastic ring) in between samples so that we don’t contaminate one layer with mud from another!

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13 September 2016

Sikuliaq week 1 recap: Through the ice

This is the latest in a series of dispatches from scientists and education officers aboard the National Science Foundation’s R/V Sikuliaq. Read more posts here. Track the Sikuliaq’s progress here. By Kim Kenny Today marks one full week at sea. We’ve gone through the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea into the Beaufort Sea, where we worked our way into the Beaufort Basin. Then we turned southwest and are now back …

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12 September 2016

Walking the line: DBO 6

Rachel’s team needs to be quick. The water samples must be kept in conditions as close to what they were collected in as possible. More to the point, the microscopic organisms in the water must be kept in similar conditions; these organisms might not react the same way to tests if they’re not kept in an environment they’re used to.

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7 September 2016

Keep your Berings Strait

Today is our first full day at sea after leaving the port of Nome yesterday morning. We’re traveling through the Bering Strait, headed toward a mooring about 30 miles off of Barrow, Alaska. (The mooring is actually that of Robert Pickart, a well known physical oceanographer who isn’t on this cruise.)

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Sikuliaq Video Dispatch: Tour the Sikuliaq

A video tour of the R/V Sikuliaq.

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Sikuliaq Dispatch: No Place Like Nome

The man I met on the plane ride here was right when he said the roads in Nome lead to rivers and to nowhere.

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6 September 2016

Ms. Callaghan’s Classroom

Hi everyone, my name is Jil Callaghan and I’m a 6th grade science teacher at Houck Middle School. I’ll be posting content for my students – who will be taught by Ms. Wright until my return in October – intermittently throughout the trip about the science done onboard. I’m looking forward to teaching from such a unique place!

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