Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Alaska Archives - AGU Blogosphere.

17 November 2017

Beavers slapping tails on far-north waters

Animals the size of Labrador retrievers are changing the face of Alaska, creating new ponds visible from space.

Read More >>


10 November 2017

Salmon complete 1,000-mile journey, and life

On a morning with biting air in the single digits Fahrenheit, this river smells like sulfur and is splashy and loud. Bald eagles and ravens swoop in the updraft of a nearby rock bluff in what looks like play.

Read More >>


3 November 2017

When Jerry Brown came to Nome

The California governor was stopping in Nome on his way to a meeting in Russia. The 79-year-old environmentalist and leader of a state that resembles a progressive nation wanted to learn why the far north matters. He had never been to the Arctic or Alaska before.

Read More >>


27 October 2017

Biographer profiles scientist-explorer of northeast Alaska

In the early 1900s, Ernest Leffingwell lived for nine summers and six winters in a cabin on Flaxman Island, a wedge of sand off Alaska’s northern coast 58 miles west of Kaktovik.

Read More >>


19 October 2017

Wolves a defining part of Alaska landscape

The wolf tracks appeared as they always do, as a surprise.

Read More >>


13 October 2017

Algae’s athletic role in glacier melt

Life exists everywhere you look. Even on glacier ice, home to inch-long worms, snow fleas, bacteria and algae.

Read More >>


6 October 2017

Finding far-north lynx den part of cycle study

There, at the root ball of a downed balsam poplar, were six lynx kittens the size of yarn balls…

Read More >>


29 September 2017

Prehistoric reptile one mile above McCarthy

It started in 1963, when 23-year-old geologist David Whistler sat down for lunch on a rocky hilltop one mile above Kennicott Glacier…

Read More >>


21 September 2017

Hurricanes and far north sea ice

Hurricanes don’t happen in Alaska because those storms are tropical by nature, but typhoons (another word for hurricanes) sometimes track north into the Bering Sea…

Read More >>


15 September 2017

Turning on the aurora switch with HAARP

People travel north from all over for a chance to see the aurora. Soon, Chris Fallen will make his own.

Read More >>


12 September 2017

Increasing rock avalanche size and mobility in Alaska may be associated with climate change

A new paper (Coe et al. 2017) strongly suggests that the cluster of 24 rock avalanches since 1984 in S. Alaska may be associated with rock permafrost degradation

Read More >>


8 September 2017

North Korea blast lights up Alaska seismometers

On Saturday night, Matt Gardine was at home outside Fairbanks playing with his daughter when his phone beeped. As the seismologist on call with the Alaska Earthquake Center, Gardine’s duty was to get information out about detectable earthquakes right after they happen.

Read More >>


1 September 2017

Slicing a 20,000 year-old mammoth tusk

In his job as a university machinist, Dale Pomraning has built and fixed earthquake detectors and aurora rockets. But recently he worked on his first object that was once part of a living creature. He and others sliced a six-foot, 100-pound wooly mammoth tusk lengthwise, sort of like a salmon filet.

Read More >>


24 August 2017

Polar bears of the past survived warmth

An ancient jawbone has led scientists to believe that polar bears survived a period thousands of years ago that was warmer than today.

Read More >>


17 August 2017

Hike across Alaska ends with after-dinner bear

There, we reached mile 0 of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline and the finish of a south-to-north walk across Alaska, most of it on the service road that parallels the pipeline.

Read More >>


11 August 2017

Final steps to Mile 0 of summer walk

I said goodbye to my final hiking partner today outside a van on the side of a gravel highway. For the remaining 40 miles in my summer hike along the path of the Trans-Alaska Highway, it will be just Cora and me.

Read More >>


4 August 2017

In fifth month, Trans-Alaska hike nears end

We just passed Trans-Alaska Pipeline mile 100, which means that distance remains on our summer hike from Valdez to Prudhoe Bay. My dog Cora and I started walking on April 30, which means we’re in our fifth month of sleeping outside.

Read More >>


20 July 2017

Dog partner enhances hike across Alaska

By Ned Rozell I suspected my brief dogless period was coming to an end when my wife and daughter were looking at puppies on the Internet. We had a few months earlier lost Poops, a Labrador retriever mix, to a tumor on a front paw. Though it was strange not to have a creature greeting you with socks in its mouth, I was enjoying the break from responsibility. But Kristen …

Read More >>


29 June 2017

High summer along the pipeline’s path

YUKON RIVER — It’s high summer, past the solstice. Everything is alive here on the path of the Trans-Alaska pipeline. Since I started this hike across Alaska on the last day of April in Valdez, the country has softened, greened up and started flowing.

Read More >>


23 June 2017

A restock and recharge along the pipeline’s path

I’ve been in Alaska’s second-largest city for a few days now, resupplying for the trip north as I hike with my dog on the path of the Trans-Alaska pipeline. Three hundred fifty miles down, 450 to go.

Read More >>