20 June 2017

Sols 1734-1735: Gazing Longingly towards Vera Rubin Ridge

Sols 1734-1735: Gazing Longingly towards Vera Rubin Ridge

Curiosity continues to drive to the east-northeast around two small patches of dunes that are positioned just north of Vera Rubin Ridge. Once beyond this easternmost dune patch, the plan is for her to turn to the southeast and towards the location identified as the safest place for Curiosity to ascend the ridge.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



18 June 2017

Sols 1732-1733: Marching Ahead towards Vera Rubin Ridge

Sols 1732-1733: Marching Ahead towards Vera Rubin Ridge

As this is my first time contributing to the Curiosity rover blog, I’d like to quickly introduce myself to you all. I’m Mark, an MSL Participating Scientist and a faculty member at Northern Arizona University, trained in geochemistry, spectroscopy, and remote sensing. I’m excited to help walk you all through the daily endeavors of this wonderful rover and mission!

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



16 June 2017

Sol 1729 – 1731: Roving Right Along

Sol 1729 - 1731: Roving Right Along

The drive on Sol 1728 was successful, and our weekend plan will be chock-full of activities. On the first sol, we will do some contact science on the rather colorful workspace that is currently in front of the Curiosity rover.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



14 June 2017

Sol 1728 Blog: Remote science and drive on

Sol 1728 Blog: Remote science and drive on

After a busy day of contact science yesterday, today’s Curiosity rover plan was dedicated towards remote science and driving. As Mastcam PUL-1 today, I was fairly busy helping put together a suite of Mastcam images for Curiosity to take.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



13 June 2017

Sol 1727 Blog: Little bit of everything

Sol 1727 Blog: Little bit of everything

After a successful drive, our parking spot included a nice patch of Murray bedrock to allow us to perform contact science (MAHLI and APXS) in today’s plan. Our target for contact science is ‘Jones Marsh,’ a dark patch of the Murray that you can see just above the rightmost corner of Curiosity’s mast shadow in the Navcam image.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



12 June 2017

Sol 1726: First Look at Vera Rubin Ridge

Sol 1726:  First Look at Vera Rubin Ridge

After great anticipation over the last few weeks, the drive in the current plan will bring us into position for stop 1 of our close look at the northern face of the hematite-bearing Vera Rubin Ridge. Mastcam will take a wide mosaic to begin documenting the sedimentary structure of the ridge.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



11 June 2017

Sol 1725: Curiosity’s four day weekend

Sol 1725: Curiosity's four day weekend

On most weekends, Curiosity dedicates part of her efforts to do contact science – deployment of APXS, MAHLI, and sometimes the DRT – because multi-sol weekend plans have more time and power to fit in these more complex activities. Last weekend, however, time and power were dedicated to a more rare, and more complex, activity – analysis of a previously-drilled rock sample by SAM.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



8 June 2017

Sols 1722-1724: Leftovers for Dinner

Sols 1722-1724:  Leftovers for Dinner

Almost the entirety of the first two sols (1722 and 1723) are dedicated to a SAM analysis of a ‘doggy bagged’ sample from the Quela drill hole collected back in September 2016 (Sol 1464). Several times in the mission we’ve saved samples from our drill locations to analyze later.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



7 June 2017

Sol 1721: An easier planning day

Sol 1721: An easier planning day

MSL drove 26 meters on Sol 1720, as planned, to a location with blocks of bedrock in the arm workspace. Because the rover climbed another 3 meters in elevation, contact science has top priority for today’s plan, with driving next in priority.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>



Sol 1720: Rough Road Ahead

Sol 1720: Rough Road Ahead

I was the Surface Properties Scientist, or SPS on staff today. The SPS has an interesting job, in that the SPS helps Rover Planners (called RPs) assess the terrain around the rover with safety in mind, first and foremost.

Read More >>

Comments/Trackbacks (0)>>