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You are browsing the archive for SciComm Archives - Page 3 of 35 - The Plainspoken Scientist.

24 March 2021

#RhymeYourResearch: Word by Word

This poem was written near the very end of my PhD, which was submitted at the start of August, 2020. It forms the self-reflection section of my thesis.

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It’s time, now more than ever, to stop saying “now, more than ever.” At least in the sciences.

There are hundreds of articles out there using “now, more than ever” to try to illustrate the importance of a scientific point (and I know that I’m guilty of this as well). But what does the phrase actually mean and why is it so ubiquitous when discussing science?

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19 March 2021

#AntarcticLog: What’s the Ecostat?

As promised, I’m back with more of that invisible science.  That’s what the Antarctic Artists and Writers program of the National Science Foundation sent me to Palmer Station to do: take a close look at invisible phytoplankton and create pictures to tell their story. 

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18 March 2021

#DrawnToGeoscience: Cross-stitching science

My grandmother taught me to cross stitch when I was in elementary school, and I stopped after a few years and came back to it in my late 20s (which seems to be a relatively common story for AFAB folks). I like it as a medium because I can spend a lot of time thinking about and playing with colors, and it’s easy to combine words, symbols, and picture elements.

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16 March 2021

The Power of Data-Driven Storytelling for Atmospheric Science

“Science is hard.” How many times have you heard that? Whether it be from students, friends, or family, a common misconception amongst people who don’t spend all their time doing science is that, well, its hard. Sure, sometimes it is, but where did this misconception come from?

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12 March 2021

#AntarcticLog: Antarctic Service Medal

Last week I received a special package in the mail: my Antarctic Service Medal, made for my contribution to U.S. efforts to understand the continent — and the planet. 

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#RhymeYourResearch: Carbon, You’re Key

Recently, I have been homeschooling one of my children. We got onto a geology kick while digging up various rocks on our walks in the woods. To better understand what we were finding, I read through a rocks and minerals handbook.

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8 March 2021

#VirtualFieldtrips: a supplementary educational tool in Covid-19 times

A virtual fieldwork can be useful in classes where students have the opportunity for a quick and realistic “visit” to a particular study area.

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5 March 2021

#AntarcticLog: Sanna’s Reindeer

Sanna Vannar is the president of Sáminuorro, the Swedish Association of Young Saami.  The Saami people span four nations: Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Russia. Sanna’s family have been reindeer herders for generations, which puts them in a unique position to evaluate the reindeer’s response to the changing northern climate.

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3 March 2021

#DrawnToGeoscience: Inspiration in Geoscience

For me, combining science & art always made natural sense. My foray into deliberately combining them came in junior high & high school when I delved into a 3-year long self-directed investigation into “What makes rocks ring?”.

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