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You are browsing the archive for SciComm Action Archives - Page 2 of 5 - The Plainspoken Scientist.

30 March 2020

Geoscientists can help: Leveraging your science and communication skills to help tackle COVID19

Are you struggling, as a geoscientist, with what you can do to be useful during the Corona Crisis? Here is something that might help: If you are a geoscientist, you are also a scientist and probably a science communicator, and you can use both of those facts to help those around you find, understand, and share the latest information about the virus. Probably the best thing we can do as geoscientists is leverage our skills and training to share and amplify the important messages from the public health community.

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2 March 2020

Dinosaurs Under the Tundra, Part 2: Talking about Climate Change with a Climate Skeptic

As a recap; home for Christmas holidays, having a nice conversation with my in-laws. My father-in-law’s wife voices skepticism about climate change. Part 1 of this blog talked about what I could learn from that skepticism, and how listening might guide future climate research.  Part 2, this part, is about how I could’ve shared some of the things I’ve learned about climate science.

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24 February 2020

Dinosaurs Under the Tundra, Part 1: Talking about Climate Change with a Climate Skeptic

I was at home over Christmas when my father-in-law’s wife started talking about the dinosaurs that used to be in Alaska. At first, I thought she was just sharing a cool geologic fact, but it turned out she was making a point about natural climate cycles.  She went on to say that she loved her little Honda and she just wanted to be able to drive it.

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17 December 2019

New climate change survey highlights disconnect b/t knowledge and action

Last month [the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication] released the most recent version of their Climate Change in the American Mind report, they find some truly interesting stuff. I summarized it via Twitter and have pasted my hot-takes below.

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2 December 2019

SciComm, policy, and outreach at AGU19!

♩It’s the most, wonderful tiiiiiiiime, of the year! ♫ 

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20 November 2019

Having “The [Climate Change] Talk” with your family

Thanksgiving can be a time for food, football, and family. And sometimes…uncomfortable family chats, especially around science. We live in a nation where there are disconnects between understanding and acceptance of major scientific issues such as GMOs, evolution, vaccinations, and (especially relevant to AGU scientists) climate change.

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11 November 2019

I had my doubts about Wikipedia…until an Edit-a-thon

I use Wikipedia. I feel like most folks on the internet have made their way to the website for one reason or another. It’s a treasure trove of information. Just the other day I found myself deep diving on 2018 earthquake that hit Alaska as it was the first (and only) one I’ve experienced. There was a lot of really science-y, technical language in the article. And I trusted it.

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9 September 2019

Getting outside the comfort of the journalism classroom to encourage science

Newsrooms are giving more attention to climate change and writing about science, so preparing future journalists to cover difficult topics is essential.

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7 June 2019

Community (and Communication) Don’t Happen Naturally

Six months ago, I had no idea what a community manager was.

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27 May 2019

Revealing the baseline of geoscience outreach

Geoscience has been one of the least diverse STEM fields for nearly four decades, perhaps in part because our science isn’t making it to those who are outside our departments and institutions. In the era of climate change skepticism, geoscientists who practice science communication could provide immense value to their local and global communities by serving as Earth experts who can empower non-scientists to engage in reasoning and analysis in all aspects of life.

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