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You are browsing the archive for Antarctic Log Archives - Page 2 of 3 - The Plainspoken Scientist.

5 March 2021

#AntarcticLog: Sanna’s Reindeer

Sanna Vannar is the president of Sáminuorro, the Swedish Association of Young Saami.  The Saami people span four nations: Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Russia. Sanna’s family have been reindeer herders for generations, which puts them in a unique position to evaluate the reindeer’s response to the changing northern climate.

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26 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Canaries in the Coal Mine

When it come to climate change and its impact on the animal world, there’s more than one “canary in the coal mine.” To mix a few potent metaphors, the dominoes are falling — and, if it’s true that God is in the details, it’s fair to say that individual animals help tell the story.  As I work to make climate change science accessible and comprehensible through #AntarcticLog, I’ve found myself leaning on keystone species.  The assortment featured here tell separate stories about the effects of global warming, and they add up to a clear picture of what’s happening. 

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19 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Ivan the Terrabus

Finally, lest you think my life is all blissful polar adventure, let me share a regret: I have not yet ridden in Ivan the Terrabus, the most excellent vehicle that carries people from the airstrip to the home-away-from-home  known as Mactown — McMurdo Station.  

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12 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Antarctic Classics 

Who’s reading #AntarcticLog comics?  Lots of different people actually. At first I thought it was just my friends and family, but as I began to cover the work of particular scientists, it caught the attention of the science community, as well.  Science communicators paid attention, and — sure enough — Antarctica worked its magic on the general population, especially teachers and their students.    

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5 February 2021

#AntarcticLog: Not the antarctic

As I studied up on phytoplankton, the subject of my team’s research at Palmer, I recalled an earlier trip, in the Arctic, where I had the chance to see diatoms unknown to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute scientist Sam Laney running the Imaging Flow Cytobot as we traveled through the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas. 

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28 January 2021

#AntarcticLog: Adequate Earth

#AntarcticLog was my primary project under the National Science Foundation’s Antarctic Artists and Writers Program.  This week, a group of artists and writers from this program are doing something big, and I wanted to tell you about it.  

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22 January 2021

#AntarcticLog: The Future of Science & Action

Thanks to voices like these, my ears are tuned — and my heart is ready — for serious and swift progress on saving the earth for future generations. May our leaders be strong and brave. 

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15 January 2021

#AntarcticLog: Science & Action

If ever there was a shaky time, this is one. I can say that from the perspective of my years. But for kids, it’s the only time they know. So I’m especially impressed at the ones who speak up, and I’m finding them all over the world.  I want to draw and quote them all — whether they’re famous (Nobel prize contenders like Greta Thunberg, who just turned 18 last week) or not, part of worldwide initiatives or lone actors. 

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8 January 2021

#AntarcticLog: Goodbye 2020

Happy New Year! Here’s a comic for the new year that looks back at some of the damage done. Nonetheless, I’m looking forward to 2021. How about you? It helps to have rose-colored glasses, otherwise known as a positive view.  This could come from an excess of irrational optimism. Or it could come from young activists who often hashtag posts about their activities to fight climate change with #fridaysforfuture.  

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3 January 2021

#AntarcticLog: Happy New Year!

Happy New Year! Let’s share a cup of something-or-other for days of time gone by — even if it’s champagne to express our joy at seeing the back of 2020. 

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