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11 November 2022

#AntarcticLog: Keeping tabs on baby penguins 

I first heard of Stéphanie Jenouvrier and her WHOI colleagues’ work assessing emperor penguins a few years ago, when I was working on my book about Antarctica and climate change. Their work had allowed them to connect projected global temperature rise with its impact on emperor penguins, making the big birds a “sentinel species” for environmental change. 

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4 November 2022

#AntarcticLog: Trick of treat for UNICEF?

On Halloween I was doing a little research on Vanessa Nakate, the Ugandan climate change activist, and learned that she has become a spokesperson for Unicef.  Halloween… Unicef… climate and hunger? I switched gears quickly to create this trick-or-treat comic with a nod to my own early activist past. 

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28 October 2022

#AntarcticLog: Penguins!

Once upon a time, I had a penguin costume. I’ve learned that, when I go into the field with scientists, it’s never a bad idea to pack a costume. And that one has definitely had legs — short legs, for sure, but I’ve seen it in a number of videos, from penguin dances for International Penguin Day to open mic nights — penguin on saxophone, anyone?

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21 October 2022

#AntarcticLog: The Ant-Antarctic

This week, artist Karen Romano Young takes us to the Arctic, another area of the world especially affected by climate change.

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14 October 2022

#AntarcticLog: Breaking ice to do some science

You could call is bush-whacking. You could call it trail-blazing.  Or you could call it ice-breaking — and not in the sense of warming up a chilly party, either.  

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10 October 2022

Youth astrobiology education continues at Blue Marble Space Institute of Science

On July 16, 2003, the famed former President of South Africa and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Nelson Mandela stood in front of a crowd in the midst of the founding of the Mindset Network and said “education is the most powerful weapon which we can use to change the world”.

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7 October 2022

#AntarcticLog: Back to the ice!

It’s springtime in Antarctica, and the scientists are heading back to the ice. Not only the scientists, but the support people working at the stations, and yes, even a few science communicators and artists. Among the first to travel to McMurdo and the South Pole in the wake of the Covid pandemic is Lauren Lipuma, editor of the U.S. Antarctic Program (and the National Science Foundation’s) newspaper, The Antarctic Sun.

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30 September 2022

#AntarcticLog: The wombat connection

I’m in Crownpoint, New Mexico this week, researching future comics at Navajo Technical University– and learned that the campus here used to have more trees. Piñon and juniper have died because of recent drought, says Abishek Roychowdhury, who teaches environmental science here. 

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23 September 2022

#AntarcticLog: Why did the ship cross the Drake Passage?

Why did the R/V Laurence M. Gould cross the fierce, fearsome Drake Passage? To get to the other side — to the Antarctic Peninsula and Palmer Station. 

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16 September 2022

#AntarcticLog: The importance of research ships

I learn so much from drawing ships.  Here is E/V Nautilus, from an artist-in-residence and science communications tour I did in 2015. Nautilus is the mother ship to Hercules, a deep-diving ROV. 

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