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14 September 2020

Making the switch from in-person to online scicomm storytelling shows

…for this post, I’m taking off my AGU hat (mostly) and stepping into one of my other roles as storyteller and producer. I also work for the science storytelling organization The Story Collider, where scientists and non-scientists alike tell true, personal stories, live on stage. Er…or at least they used to. 

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11 August 2020

Advocating for climate science

A growing number of scientists in the United States are politically active and engaged, especially around issues affecting science. And researchers have the right to participate in advocacy, even if they work for federal agencies or state-funded institutions. Despite this, we at the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund frequently speak with scientists deterred from advocacy after hearing of well-meaning colleagues who’ve been accused, for example, of violating anti-lobbying laws for writing an op-ed.

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10 August 2020

#AGURocks: Breathing new life (i.e. geology lyrics) into old songs

#AGURocks is a series of posts by musicians who create science-inspired music and explain their process and inspiration while also showcasing their pieces. Learn more about contributing. The views and lyrics expressed in this post and song do not reflect those of Sharing Science and AGU. This week, Ben Edwards. I started playing the acoustic guitar when I was about 10, had a few years of piano and coronet lessons, …

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31 July 2020

#AGURocks: Rocking natural history, ecology and evolution

Is it unusual for a Boomer full professor to pick up a ukulele and learn how to play – I can’t really answer that question but I can tell you it’s been a fun ride…

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24 July 2020

Zoonotic Diseases: Plugging the Source Before the Flood

A whopping seventy-five percent of emerging diseases have been said to be zoonotic, meaning that such diseases can spread from wildlife to humans, an example being our current pandemic consisting of Covid-19 a bat-to-human infection.

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23 July 2020

Reduction of Ice Extent in Arctic Region Cause PDV Transmission Between Arctic and Pacific Region

This article focuses on reduction of sea ice extent in Arctic region which is caused by climate change might introduce many diseases that are locked in Arctic to sub-Arctic regions. The virus they track is called Phocine distemper disease (PDV), and it is a pathogen that majorly causes high rate of mortality in European harbor seals of northern Atlantic Ocean.

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22 July 2020

The Four Corners Outbreak of 1993

In May, 1993 a 19-year old man suddenly developed shortness of breath while driving through the Four Corners region in New Mexico. He had complained of fever and muscle pain a few days before, but generally was in good health. By the time he pulled over and paramedics arrived, he had gone into respiratory failure and later died from an acute pulmonary edema in the emergency department of Gallup Indian Medical Center.

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20 July 2020

Pigs: Mixing pots for influenza

I was recently reading an article on Healthline.com that discussed a new form of swine flu that was recently discovered in China.  The new strain is called G4, and it has come to researcher’s attention after being discovered in Chinese pigs. 

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17 July 2020

Research Suggests Leprosy to be a Zoonosis, The Reservoir: Armadillos

Leprosy, renamed Hansen’s Disease, is a chronic condition caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). The disease primarily targets the skin and peripheral nerves, however new forms of the bacteria have also been found to affect other areas such as the eyes, testicles, and bones. An individual, once infected, typically shows an incubation period of three to seven years.

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16 July 2020

Anthrax, a cool band name but devastating to reindeer

Anthrax, also known as Bacillus anthracis, is a gram-positive bacterium that has a very high fatality rate up to 80% when inhaled. This deadly bacterium is now a yearly ticking timebomb in northern Russia every summer, devastating the local wildlife and spreading to humans.

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