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9 September 2020

Want to do outreach but don’t know where to start? We got you.

Science communication is a catch-all phrase that means so many things. Even when narrowing it down to scientists talking about their research to (mostly) non-scientists, there are still so many avenues and places to start.

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4 September 2020

#AGURocks: The Intersection of Music and Science

I didn’t start making and recording music until college, where I met some friends who had similar interests to me. They pushed me to write songs with them in a band, which was something I had wanted to do forever, but had lacked the courage to create and perform in live settings. As I progressed through my microbiology degrees, both as an undergraduate and graduate student, I used music as a way to vent about broader institutional issues I saw in the sciences.

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17 August 2020

International Observe the Moon Night: An Opportunity for Global Outreach

International Observe the Moon Night is an annual worldwide public engagement program that encourages observation, appreciation, and understanding of our Moon and its connection to planetary science and exploration. It is also a time to celebrate our personal and cultural connections to Earth’s nearest celestial neighbor.

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3 August 2020

My name is Jacqui, and I am a science communicator.

My name is Jacqui, and I am a science communicator. There. I admit it.

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27 July 2020

Two scientists walk into a bar

Every few months, fifty scientists head out to bars around San Diego. Well, fifty more than a usual Thursday night. The event is called Two Scientists Walk Into A Bar and, more than just the start to a corny joke, it’s a science communication program designed to reveal scientists as the mere mortals we are.

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20 July 2020

Pigs: Mixing pots for influenza

I was recently reading an article on Healthline.com that discussed a new form of swine flu that was recently discovered in China.  The new strain is called G4, and it has come to researcher’s attention after being discovered in Chinese pigs. 

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17 July 2020

Research Suggests Leprosy to be a Zoonosis, The Reservoir: Armadillos

Leprosy, renamed Hansen’s Disease, is a chronic condition caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). The disease primarily targets the skin and peripheral nerves, however new forms of the bacteria have also been found to affect other areas such as the eyes, testicles, and bones. An individual, once infected, typically shows an incubation period of three to seven years.

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13 July 2020

A Troubling Site: Mass Death of Botswanan Elephant Population

Since early March, there has been mass death among the elephant population in Botswana. The cause? We don’t know. The Botswanan government has ruled out three causes: poison, poaching, and anthrax. Yet, there has been significant question in the government’s handling of elephant mortality.

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10 July 2020

Debunking the alleged connection between Lyme disease and Unrelated Conditions

Lyme Disease, or Lyme Borreliosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the Borrelia genus of Bacteria. This bacteria is usually transferred to a human host by the bite of a tick. Lyme disease can effect the host’s neurology and often results in fever, headache, tiredness, various bodily pains, and in some cases memory loss. Lyme disease has proven to be a major problem in the United States, affecting an estimated 300,000 Americans yearly. 

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9 July 2020

Danse Macabre, Not as Fun as it Sounds

Wildlife diseases not only impact the health of humans and animals, but they also play a large role in generating artistic trends. One such trend in, or genre of, art was the Danse Macabre, also known as the Dance of Death. This French term comes from the artistic genre that was seen in 1250 to 1500 CE Europe, during the Late Middle Ages. It symbolizes the fact that the journey of life and death is expired by all, and is a uniting theme despite its morbid tone.  

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