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13 July 2020

A Troubling Site: Mass Death of Botswanan Elephant Population

Since early March, there has been mass death among the elephant population in Botswana. The cause? We don’t know. The Botswanan government has ruled out three causes: poison, poaching, and anthrax. Yet, there has been significant question in the government’s handling of elephant mortality.

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10 July 2020

Debunking the alleged connection between Lyme disease and Unrelated Conditions

Lyme Disease, or Lyme Borreliosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the Borrelia genus of Bacteria. This bacteria is usually transferred to a human host by the bite of a tick. Lyme disease can effect the host’s neurology and often results in fever, headache, tiredness, various bodily pains, and in some cases memory loss. Lyme disease has proven to be a major problem in the United States, affecting an estimated 300,000 Americans yearly. 

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9 July 2020

Danse Macabre, Not as Fun as it Sounds

Wildlife diseases not only impact the health of humans and animals, but they also play a large role in generating artistic trends. One such trend in, or genre of, art was the Danse Macabre, also known as the Dance of Death. This French term comes from the artistic genre that was seen in 1250 to 1500 CE Europe, during the Late Middle Ages. It symbolizes the fact that the journey of life and death is expired by all, and is a uniting theme despite its morbid tone.  

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7 July 2020

First you were like, “whoa!” Then we were like, “WHOA!” And then you were like, “Fibropapillomatosis.”

There is currently a disease that is costing green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, more than just a fin or some “noggin” – it is taking their lives. Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a disease with a cause that is unknown. Here is what we know.

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3 July 2020

15 feet Tall and Threatened!

Wild giraffes across Africa are suffering from multiple skin disorders. The Rothschild’s giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis rothschild) population is shrinking at an alarming rate in Kenya and Uganda. Located in Uganda, Murchison Falls National Park (MFNP) did a survey in 2016 that discovered that one third of their giraffes had rash-like lesions of unknown origin.

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2 July 2020

Rabies: What Do You Really Know?

When people think of rabies, they are most likely visualizing an aggressive animal foaming at the mouth and ready to viciously attack any living thing in sight, but is this image always the case?

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22 June 2020

Writing about wildlife diseases

It’s that time of year again when I head to rural Pennsylvania to teach a field course in disease ecology for undergraduates at my alma mater, the University of Pittsburgh. 

No it’s not. But it should be.

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20 April 2020

Virtual Reality in Climate Adaptation and Community Engagement

As coastal communities worldwide contend with sea level rise, coastal erosion, and other impacts of climate change, a critical piece of the puzzle has become educating stakeholders in highly creative, insightful and practical ways that inspire equitable action.

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13 January 2020

K-12 Teachers: Earth & Environmental Science need YOU

We all share the burden of climate change. However, an unequal representation among earth and environmental scientists means little cross-cultural appeal to young scientists to discover and apply solutions to climate change. Because our career choices can be strongly influenced and inspired by a good teacher, my colleagues and I work to improve earth science teaching at the K-12 level.

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6 January 2020

Fall Meeting was amazing. What now?

Now that the holiday season is (largely) over, we’re reflecting here at Sharing Science on the successes of Fall Meeting and where we go from here.

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