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You are browsing the archive for Public Archives - Page 2 of 9 - The Plainspoken Scientist.

4 June 2021

#AntarcticLog: Antarctic Trees (from long ago)

No, there are no longer trees in Antarctica — though there were, many thousands of years ago. (Did you know Antarctica used to be unfrozen? But that’s another story for another post.)  But trees — especially the oak trees featured in these three #AntarcticLog comics — have plenty to say about what’s going on in their environment, and around the globe. 

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28 May 2021

#AntarcticLog: Reeling in Kids

#AntarcticLog is created with a broad audience in mind — from the savviest adults to kids new to the subject of scientific research — and adventure! — in the Antarctic. This week’s examples come from a series created to introduce kids (of any age) to the Antarctic food chain. 

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21 May 2021

#AntarcticLog: Plankton is (surprisingly) cool

Before the pandemic, a long time ago (or so it seems), I used to go to New York City and wonder at all the people — and their brilliant personalities, ideas, forms, and functions — concentrated in that small space.   One time I made my way to a midtown gallery where Pete Countway, a researcher at the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Science, had plankton on display. 

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12 May 2021

#AntarcticLog: Permafrost isn’t so frosty

Based on the last few thousand years, it’s supposed to be like this: After a winter freeze comes a spring thaw. Not that there isn’t plenty of evidence of climate change: tornadoes and a longer growing season are among the easiest to see. Toward the poles, however, where global warming is multiplied, bigger changes are afoot: underfoot, actually, as the permafrost layer thins, buckles, and crumbles.  

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6 May 2021

#AntarcticLog: Antarctic Artists

In these still socially-distanced times, one of the things I miss most is a good chin-wag. The chance to sit around the fire or the table, swapping yarns, seems a long way off.  Maybe next autumn?

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9 April 2021

#AntArcticLog: Narwhals, narwhals, swimming in the ocean (& other whales)…

One thing I never got to do a comic about during the time at Palmer Station were the whales. Whales spouting at a distance…breaching nearby…diving, fluking, flapping…and, in the gray gloom of an early winter morning, taking an audible inhale before disappearing under the surface, ahead of a background of icebergs.  I extended my comic coverage of whales to the Arctic, as well, for the Polar Whale series. 

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6 April 2021

#AntarcticLog: The movement of glaciers

With a rumble, a rush, a splash, a gush, the glacier that forms our dramatic backdrop makes like a cow — and calves — dropping a blockbuster baby of ice into Arthur Harbor. If you’re lucky, you whirl toward it in time to see the ice fall, far enough away that the wave it creates seems to form in slow motion.  Then the roar of the wave reaches your ears across the distance. 

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29 March 2021

How to be an effective STEM role model

By Jessica Taylor Several years ago, I became interested in training colleagues to work outreach events. I was specifically interested in addressing the gender gap in the sciences and making sure these interactions practiced gender equitable strategies.  With the help of my team we developed a role model training program. We pulled from great resources such as the SciGirls Role Model Strategy Guide, TechBridge’s Role Models Matter resources, and publications …

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26 March 2021

#AntarcticLog: How do we see what we can’t see?

More invisible stuff, you cry? What ELSE can comics show that’s tough to see? 

A big part of my Antarctic Artists and Writers program project involved making the invisible visible through visual storytelling — which can mean all kinds of things, but in my case means comics.  

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18 March 2021

#DrawnToGeoscience: Cross-stitching science

My grandmother taught me to cross stitch when I was in elementary school, and I stopped after a few years and came back to it in my late 20s (which seems to be a relatively common story for AFAB folks). I like it as a medium because I can spend a lot of time thinking about and playing with colors, and it’s easy to combine words, symbols, and picture elements.

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