Advertisement

This is an archive of AGU's GeoSpace blog through 1 July 2020. New content about AGU research can be found on Eos and the AGU newsroom.

You are browsing the archive for Joseph Cariz.

21 December 2017

Organic aerosols in remote areas have shorter lives than scientists assumed

Scientists find the lifetime of organic aerosols in the upper atmosphere is on the order of 10 days, far shorter than scientists previously assumed.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


18 December 2017

NASA Solves How a Jupiter Jet Stream Shifts into Reverse

Speeding through the atmosphere high above Jupiter’s equator is an east–west jet stream that reverses course on a schedule almost as predictable as a Tokyo train’s. Now, a NASA-led team has identified which type of wave forces this jet to change direction.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


15 December 2017

High-resolution climate models present alarming new projections for U.S.

Researchers have developed new, high-resolution climate models that may help policymakers mitigate the effects of climate change at a local level.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


Lava-filled blocks on Venus may indicate geological activity

A global view of some well-known deformation features on Venus’s surface may indicate it’s capable of crustal motion, and that motion might even be happening today, scientists report.

Read More >>

1 Comment/Trackback >>


Proteins in shark teeth could hint at what they eat

Certain molecules found in shark teeth proteins could tell scientists how the predators are connected to other animals in the food web, according to new research.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


Coastal erosion threatens archaeological sites along Greenland’s fjords

Hundreds of archaeology sites lie along the shores of Greenland’s fjords and coasts, revealing the entirety of the country’s ancestral cultures from as many as four thousand years ago. Coastal erosion, however, may soon drop many of those ancestral links into the ocean.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


Subterranean Serendipity: Scientists stumble upon a new way to sample magma

Scientists have never directly observed magma beneath the Earth’s surface. But thanks to the discovery of easily accessible magma chambers, it may now be possible, report scientists at the 2017 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


14 December 2017

Earwax like ice cores: Unlocking the past hidden in whale earplugs

Data collectors are cruising around oceans worldwide, following blooms of productivity and accumulating decades of information—all from earwax. New research shows whale earplugs provide records of the animals’ movements and diets over the course of their long lives.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


The continental U.S. is experiencing more flooding, and earlier in the year

The frequency of flooding in the continental U.S. is increasing, and seasonality of floods is shifting, according to new research.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


6 December 2017

Scientists capture Earth’s “hum” on ocean floor

Researchers have successfully quantified Earth’s vibrational “hum” using seismic instruments on the bottom of the ocean. A new study determined at the ocean bottom the frequencies at which the Earth naturally vibrates, and confirmed the viability of using ocean instruments to study the phenomenon.

Read More >>

6 Comments/Trackbacks >>