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3 February 2023

#AntarcticLog: Getting there

As the sea level rises, so many of us will be seeking higher ground.  This week, I feature a new podcast using that name.  It sits at that intersection of so many matters of my heart — climate change, public information, kids, science identity — and, what’s more, it’s situated where I grew up. 

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27 January 2023

#AntarcticLog: #FridaysforFuture

I’ve made no secret of my admiration for youth climate activists around the world. This week’s #AntarcticLog features four from Kenya and Uganda, along with quotes from their social media posts. 

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20 January 2023

#AntarcticLog: Antarctic Bears

When you think of Antarctic beasts, the tardigrade might not be the first to come to mind. But new research from the British Antarctic Survey shows that the ones in Antarctica represent a divergence hailing back to the time when the continent was cut off from the rest of the world. 

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13 January 2023

#AntarcticLog: Ecosystem Services 

What makes an animal a hero? Maybe it’s the services it naturally supplies to its ecosystem — services that may help plants, waterways, other animals, and yes, humans. Some researchers are even coming up with dollar amounts that people would have to pay for the services beavers provide. 

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6 January 2023

#AntarcticLog: Happy New Year!

The South Pole is as mysterious to me as it is to you. I rely on other people’s stories to get a sense of what it’s like.  This one’s from Guy Guthridge, and I appreciate it. Even more, I appreciate Guy, who founded the National Science Foundation’s Antarctic Artists and Writers program. I’m always looking for ways to get back to the ice — in person or through stories like this. 

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30 December 2022

#AntarcticLog: Hopey New Year!

As we start 2023, I’m bright-eyed and bushy-tailed with optimism, so this post is a look back at some of the hopeful comics in the last five years. 

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23 December 2022

#AntarcticLog: Adrift at the North Pole 

At this time of year, some of us are focused on what’s coming from the North Pole. This #AntarcticLog’s about how to get TO the North Pole — and beyond! 

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16 December 2022

#AntarcticLog: Blasts from the past

Magical? Science? Sure, as samples offer clues to unseen, unknown worlds nothing like our own, the metaphors turn to ideas like time machines and portals, and the adjectives turn to fantasy.  And yet — it’s real!  Check this — new proof of ecosystems and species previously unknown, based on a few grains of dirt. 

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9 December 2022

#AntarcticLog: Beyond the “Wall”

Yes, I’m shocked each time I see a scientist take time to get interviewed by someone debunking a false claim about climate change, Antarctica, space, you name it. Besides debunking the debunking, my contribution this week is a look back at just a few #AntarcticLog comics that focus on the work of scientists who worked in Antarctic’s interior.  

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2 December 2022

AntarcticLog: Diversifying Antarctica 

#AntarcticLog is a series of comics by Karen Romano Young. You can find the originals here. There are many efforts afoot to increase minority perspectives in the sciences. As we celebrate the 63rd anniversary of the Antarctic Treaty, which designated Antarctica as an international continent dedicated to knowledge and peace, we acknowledge the lack of diversity there — and elsewhere.   In my new project, I Was A Kid, which launched …

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