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24 December 2021

#AntarcticLog: In appreciation of dogs

It can be far easier for furry, four-footed friends to cross treacherous Antarctic ridges and formations than people or vehicles. Time was, back in the age of the heroic explorers, dogs were helpful for transport, warmth, companionship — and sometimes, food. 

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10 December 2021

#AntarcticLog: Introducing I Was a Kid!

There’s something truly thrilling happening in the sciences — an effort to increase diversity and inclusion among the ranks. Across our research institutions I see a new emphasis on supporting all, and inspiring more to target science for their own careers. Because I write and draw so much for young people, that’s where I’ve put my energy for the last year and a half, and now I’m ready to share it. 

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23 November 2021

Sharing Science at AGU21

Well, it’s that time of year again. No, not the holidays (well, yes, that too). It’s AGU’s Fall Meeting!

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17 November 2021

#DrawnToGeoscience: Storytelling via Zine

I have been interested in science communication, art, and literature since the start of my education in the environmental sciences. There are as many ways of communicating science as there are scientists: graphs, figures, presentations, papers, books, lectures. By channeling information about dissolved organic matter biogeochemistry into a comic book—a recognizable form, with its own connotations—I wanted to spark contemplation of what it means to produce and communicate scientific knowledge.

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8 October 2021

#AntarcticLog: Kids are our (climate) future

When I think about what the world’s kids have been through for the last year and a half — since the start of the pandemic — I want to cry. And yet look at them — out stumping for climate change action, using their artwork to voice their concerns, wishes, and — as it right for the next generation — demands. 

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17 September 2021

#AntarcticLog: The importance of stories

By now I shouldn’t be surprised — just grateful — at the way certain stories have broad appeal.  I’m beginning to learn to trust myself — that stories and images that appeal to me will affect others too. Maybe not the same way as they affect me, but in the way of individual people wherever they are. For example, this one, featuring Mother Earth. 

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2 August 2021

Astrobiology Studies for Kids (ASK)

This summer, something beautiful and unique took place in the STEM education world. Run by Blue Marble Space Institute of Science (BMSIS), an online Astrobiology Studies for Kids (ASK) program invited undergraduate students from all over the world to discuss astrobiology with dozens of pre-teens. The topics ranged from exoplanets, planetary geology, and ocean worlds to space fungi, astrovirology, and cyborgs.

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28 May 2021

#AntarcticLog: Reeling in Kids

#AntarcticLog is created with a broad audience in mind — from the savviest adults to kids new to the subject of scientific research — and adventure! — in the Antarctic. This week’s examples come from a series created to introduce kids (of any age) to the Antarctic food chain. 

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8 March 2021

#VirtualFieldtrips: a supplementary educational tool in Covid-19 times

A virtual fieldwork can be useful in classes where students have the opportunity for a quick and realistic “visit” to a particular study area.

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22 February 2021

Keeping socially connected with science podcasts

March 2020 may have marked the closure of gates to physical spaces for science engagement, but it also opened the portal to new social spaces to keep the science conversations going. This is exactly what happened to my institution and a local arboretum, where an existing partnership that relied upon on-site programming found a new way to continue and grow our collaborations.

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