Advertisement

You are browsing the archive for Students Archives - The Plainspoken Scientist.

11 January 2021

Science communication, policy, and outreach jobs/fellowships 2021

As someone who transitioned out of academia (mostly), I get asked this question a lot: Where should I look for scicomm/policy jobs and fellowships? Well, I have some suggestions.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


4 January 2021

Communicating with diverse audiences through Skype-A-Scientist

Science communication can be described as the practice of communicating scientific ideas to a general audience — in a “plainspoken” manner, if you fancy. From prior experiences, I felt comfortable with my communication skills, so I signed up for Skype a Scientist, and was matched in about a month.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


21 December 2020

(Re)introducing the Sharing Science Virtual Learning Hub

For each webinar, we’ve created additional content to convey key points via multiple mediums. I’ve taken to TikTok and Reels to create scicomm videos with my dog. Our own Olivia Ambrogio has flexed her artistic drawing skills by creating <1-minute animations as well as animated webinar summaries. And our graphic design department has been putting together infographic summaries. 

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


7 December 2020

#AGU20 Sharing Science Week 1 Recap

One of my favorite features is the ability to watch recordings of the events/sessions afterwards, so if you missed it live, you can catch it later. So, below find a recap of (mostly) Sharing Science events and where to watch them.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


12 August 2020

#DrawnToGeoscience: Spot the Differences

During the first few weeks of lockdown, I spent my weekends coloring microbes, soil, and Sonoran Desert-themed drawings. In addition, I started following scientist who use art for #SciComm and science artists on social media. I was extremely inspired by Drs. Karen Vaughan and Yamina Pressler’s For The Love Of Soil art prints. Fortunately, I was able to attend a live session hosted by Dr. Pressler on how to create whimsical soil profiles using watercolors. There was no turning back from there.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


31 July 2020

#AGURocks: Rocking natural history, ecology and evolution

Is it unusual for a Boomer full professor to pick up a ukulele and learn how to play – I can’t really answer that question but I can tell you it’s been a fun ride…

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


24 July 2020

Zoonotic Diseases: Plugging the Source Before the Flood

A whopping seventy-five percent of emerging diseases have been said to be zoonotic, meaning that such diseases can spread from wildlife to humans, an example being our current pandemic consisting of Covid-19 a bat-to-human infection.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


23 July 2020

Reduction of Ice Extent in Arctic Region Cause PDV Transmission Between Arctic and Pacific Region

This article focuses on reduction of sea ice extent in Arctic region which is caused by climate change might introduce many diseases that are locked in Arctic to sub-Arctic regions. The virus they track is called Phocine distemper disease (PDV), and it is a pathogen that majorly causes high rate of mortality in European harbor seals of northern Atlantic Ocean.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


22 July 2020

The Four Corners Outbreak of 1993

In May, 1993 a 19-year old man suddenly developed shortness of breath while driving through the Four Corners region in New Mexico. He had complained of fever and muscle pain a few days before, but generally was in good health. By the time he pulled over and paramedics arrived, he had gone into respiratory failure and later died from an acute pulmonary edema in the emergency department of Gallup Indian Medical Center.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>


21 July 2020

Debunked Myths about the Bubonic Plague

The Black Death, believed to have been caused by infection with the bacterium Yersinia pestis, killed about 100 million people worldwide in the fourteenth century. However, there is still much that is unknown about this deadly disease, also known as the bubonic plague, and there are still myths about it that continue to be spread. Even though it wiped out a decent portion of Europe all those years ago, if someone were to contract the disease today it no longer means death thanks to modern medicine.

Read More >>

No Comments/Trackbacks >>